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Posts Tagged ‘19-2’

A man talked about his son who wasn’t feeling well because of a fever. He said an equivalent of this in French: “He wasn’t feeling good. He had a fever.”

To say this, he used a verb heard in colloquial langauge: filer.

Here’s what he said:

I’ filait pas. I’ faisait d’la fièvre.
He wasn’t feeling good. He had a fever.

In informal writing, you’ll see this verb spelled as filer or feeler. We’ll go with the gallicised spelling filer here.

In the sense of to not feel well (or, colloquially, to not feel good), filer is used in the negative: i’ filait pas, i’ file pas, j’filais pas, j’file pas, tu filais pas, tu files pas, etc.

Remember, il is virtually always pronounced i’ in colloquial language. This might be shown in writing as i’ or y (i’ filait pas or y filait pas).

Remember too that, in colloquial language, ne is avoided. That’s why it’s said as i’ filait pas and not il ne filait pas.

We’ve seen filer before. In #155 (which was almost a thousand entries ago, so I’ll forgive you if you forgot), a character from the television show 19-2 says:

Tu files pas, tu m’appelles, ok?
[If] you don’t feel good, you call me, ok?

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During a conversation, someone said an equivalent in French of go early.

As an example, maybe you’d say go early to someone who needed to go to a walk-in clinic to see a doctor, and you wanted to advise that person to go first thing in the morning before many other people arrived.

How might you say go early then?

Here’s what the person said:

Vas-y de bonne heure.
Go early.

The expression de bonne heure means early.

*

Five years ago to the day, we looked at a quote from the TV show 19-2:

The scene:

Two policemen have been called to investigate a building. When they arrive, they step out of their patrol car. That’s when one of the policemen sees someone moving about inside the building. To alert his partner, he says: Y’a què’qu’un en d’dans! There’s someone inside!

Y’a què’qu’un en d’dans is a contraction of il y a quelqu’un en dedans.

In colloquial language, quelqu’un can lose its l. The contracted què’qu’un sounds like quèc’un.

You’ll remember that là-dessus contracts to là-d’ssus (sounds like ladsu) in spoken language. Similarly, en dedans loses a syllable and contracts to en d’dans (sounds like anddan).

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Mohammad asks about a word he heard while watching 19-2. This word is adon. He sent me the dialogue where it occurred. It went like this:

Nick : C’est un adon.
Ben : T’es sûr?
Nick : Fie-toi sur moi. Je sais que c’est poche, mais c’est juste un ostie d’adon.

Adon here means coincidence.

Nick: It’s a coincidence.
Ben: You sure?
Nick: Trust me. I know it sucks, but it’s just a fucking coincidence.

In the dialogue, we’ve got the vulgar word ostie. Note that ostie is followed by de when you’re using it like the English a fucking [noun].

un ostie d’adon (a fucking coincidence)
un ostie de menteur (a fucking liar)
un ostie de bon show (a fucking good show)
une ostie d’arnaque (a fucking scam)
une ostie de folle (a fucking madwoman)
une ostie de grosse mouche (a big fucking fly)

It’s un or une before ostie depending on the gender of the noun. Un menteurun ostie de menteur. Une arnaqueune ostie d’arnaque.

Using adon, the answer to the question in the title is c’est juste un adon. You can hear this sentence pronounced by Cynthia Dulude in this video from the Listen section. In the transcription, you’ll find it in the third paragraph.

Another way adon is used is in the expression être d’adon. Someone who’s friendly, accessible, helpful, easy to get along with, etc., can be said to be d’adon.

Y’est ben d’adon.
He’s really friendly, easy to get along with, etc. (Ben is a reduction of bien. It sounds like bain and means very, really here.)

The newest OffQc guide Entendu au Québec is now available. Read more about it here or buy and download it here in the OffQc store.

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A word that came up on OffQc back in 2011 and that we’ve never looked at again is boqué. The usage we looked at came from a dialogue in the television show 19-2, where boqué was used as both a noun and adjective:

— Ça doit pas être facile… travailler avec un boqué de même.
— Non… j’peux être aussi boqué que lui.

— Must not be easy… working with a stubborn guy like that.
— No… (but) I can be just as stubborn as him.

From 19-2, season 1, episode 6,
Radio-Canada, 9 March 2011.

You’ll also see boqué spelled in informal writing as bucké or bocké, given that it’s believed by certain speakers to derive from the English buck. The Usito dictionary, however, recognises the Québécois verb boquer [meaning to stand up to, refuse to obey], says it derives from bouquer, and says it’s also heard in other parts of the francophonie, like Switzerland, so it may in fact be a false anglicism.

I went on a little hunt for examples of this word online to illustrate its use:

Bref le monsieur, ben boqué à rester dans les années 1900, est reparti en disant qu’il allait revenir demain.
In short, the man, determined to remain stuck in the 1900s, left and said he’d come back tomorrow.
(Dans les années can be pronounced informally as dins années*; qu’il allait is pronounced informally as qu’y’allait.)

Il n’y a pas moyen de le faire changer d’idée, il est bucké.
It’s impossible to get him to change his mind, he’s stubborn.
(Il n’y a pas moyen is pronounced informally as y’a pas moyen; il est is pronounced informally as yé.)

Il était boqué sur son idée de sushis, fait qu’on a mangé ça.
He wouldn’t budge on his idea to eat sushi, so that’s what we had.
(Il était is pronounced informally as y’étaitfait que here is the informal faque we looked at recently.)

J’écoute toutes sortes de musique variées… Ça va du Linkin Park à Frank Sinatra à du EDM, du Hardcore, etc. Je suis pas trop bucké là-dessus!
I listen to all kinds of varied music… It ranges from Linkin Park to Frank Sinatra to EDM, Hardcore, etc. I’m not too stubborn about it!
(Je suis is pronounced informally as j’su’/chu or j’suis/chui.)

*If you want to hear an example of dans les années pronounced informally as dins années (sounds like dain z’année), look on YouTube for the song Camping Ste-Germaine by Les Cowboys Fringants.

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«Tu files pas, tu m'appelles, OK?» [heard in 19-2]

«Tu files pas, tu m’appelles, OK?» [heard on the TV show 19-2]

In today’s entry, let’s focus our attention on the informal verb feeler heard in Québécois French.

We’ve seen the verb feeler come up in a few entries lately, so I’ve pulled together all examples of it on OffQc to see them here in one spot.

The verb feeler (sounds like filé) means “to feel” — we’ll see in what ways below — and is an informal usage only, borrowed from English.

Because this verb is largely an oral usage and not permitted in the standard form of French used in Québec, you’ll see different spellings applied to it when it manages to show up in writing. For example, you might see the first-person present tense spelled as je feel (and j’feel), je file (and j’file) and sometimes as je feele (and j’feele).

The informally contracted j’ sounds like ch before the letter f. So j’feel sounds like chfile.

In fact, the verb feeler isn’t a strictly québécois usage because, in entry #805, la Néo-Brunswickoise Lisa LeBlanc uses it in her song J’pas un cowboy when she sings these lyrics:

1. J’feel toute seule en calvaire.
I feel lonely as hell.

In the description of that same entry, we also saw:

2. J’feel pas ben.
I don’t feel good.

In entry #525, we looked at these examples of feeler:

3. Y file pas ce soir.
He doesn’t feel good this evening.

4. J’file pas fort ce matin.
I don’t feel great this morning.

Those last two sentences could also be said as:

5. Y file pas à soir.
6. J’file pas fort à matin.

That’s because à matin and à soir exist alongside ce matin and ce soir in Québec. The more formal the language is, the more likely you are to encounter the forms using ce.

In entry #748, we saw faire feeler cheap:

7. Tu m’as fait feeler cheap.
You made me feel bad (about myself).

In entry #155, we saw this example of feeler taken from a television series from Québec called 19-2:

8. Tu files pas, tu m’appelles, OK?
(If) you don’t feel good, you call me, OK?

The French word si (if) wasn’t used here, but it’s understood. Also, in this scene from 19-2, the character was emotionally down rather than physically ill.

In entry #796, we saw a few more examples of feeler:

9. Je file tout croche.
I feel bad. I don’t feel good.

10. Je file cheap en maudit.
I feel so damn bad (e.g., for something said or done).

11. Je file pas ben pantoute.
I don’t feel good at all.

You’ll notice in 3, 5 and 8 there’s no word to describe the person’s state, like ben. It’s just the verb followed by pas (y file pas, tu files pas, j’feel pas, etc.). If someone “doesn’t feel,” it’s understood the person “doesn’t feel good.”

With your friends from Québec, there’s no problem using these examples. You wouldn’t want to use them in more formal writing and speaking situations though, or in front of particularly persnickety persons or frustratingly fussy French profs. (You’ll forgive me for my horrible alliterations because I’m writing this at 5 o’clock in the morning.)

If you needed to avoid these examples, you could say things like:

Je me sens mal.
Ça [ne] va pas.
Je [ne] me sens pas bien.
Je vais mal.
Je me sens malade.
Je suis malade…

Here are four more example sentences for good measure!

12. J’feel pas assez pour fêter avec vous autres.
I don’t feel good enough to celebrate with you guys.

13. J’file pas ben ben aujourd’hui.
I’m not feeling so hot today.

14. Désolé, mais j’feel pas ton texte.
I’m not “feeling” what you wrote (e.g, article, essay).
What you wrote isn’t doing it for me.

15. Je commence à pas ben feeler.
I’m starting to not feel good.

Image credit: Leonid Mamchenkov

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