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Posts Tagged ‘30 vies’

In his latest article, Rabii Rammal writes about his mother who lived through the war. The bomb warnings that would drop from the sky (and facetiously paraphrased here by Rabii) used to read:

« Salut, vous, votre quartier passe au cash dans quelques heures. Mettons que si on était vous, on resterait pas pour un dernier verre. »

“Hello, in a few hours, you and your neighbourhood are in for it. Let’s just say if we were you, we wouldn’t stick around for a last drink.”

[Rabii Rammal, “Ma mère est une peureuse,” La Presse, 26 April 2015]

Passer au cash…

Passer à la caisse means to go to the cash (and pay). Cash is the English word for caisse. The expression passer au cash used here also means to pay, but in the sense of receiving a punishment or getting in trouble.

Attends que j’te pogne… tu vas passer au cash!
Wait till I catch you… you’re gonna pay!, you’re in for it!, you’re gonna get it!

You can also learn the expression mettons que from Rabii’s quote above. It means let’s (just) say that. We saw an example of this expression in #260 when a school teacher from the TV show 30 vies said:

J’suis contente que ça se calme dans ma classe parce que, côté famille, là… mettons que… mettons que ça se corse.

I’m happy things are calming down in my class because, as far as home goes… let’s just say… let’s just say things are getting complicated.

[30 vies, season 1, episode 54, Radio-Canada, 12 April 2011]

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I watched the first 10 minutes of an episode of 30 vies on tou.tv and picked some French for us to look at.

Each example of French below was said by a character on the show. If you want to find them on the show, the episode details are at the end of the post. After each quote, I’ve included the time where it appeared.

You can watch 30 vies on tou.tv if you’re in Canada.

Là, tu fais ça ou tu disparais de ma vie. C’est-tu clair?
Now you’re gonna do it or you get out of my life. Is that clear?
(0:22)

We’ve been seeing in the last few entries that often means “now.” Here’s another example of it. Here, it means more “now” in the sense of “right so,” as a way of signalling that the other person ought to listen up. The speaker used it to lead into her nasty comment.

We’ve also got c’est-tu clair? in this quote. Remember, the informal tu transforms c’est clair into a yes-no question. C’est clair. C’est-tu clair?

The question c’est-tu clair? here is really a warning. It’s like asking “is that understood?” in an authoritative way.

— Ça parle de toi en masse.
— Qui ça?
— People are totally talking about you.
— Who?
(6:55)

A student at school told his classmate: ça parle de toi en masse. The subject ça here just means “people” or “they.” It’s like the subject on. The expression en masse means something like “big time” or “totally.”

Notice that his classmate responded with qui ça? to ask who. You’ll also hear people say où ça? to ask where, for example: –Viens-tu avec moi? –Où ça?

J’en peux p’us. J’sus à boutte!
I can’t take it anymore. I’ve had it!
(7:53)

J’en peux p’us is a shortened, colloquial way of saying je n’en peux plus. Plus here is pronounced plu, but sometimes plus gets shortened to the pronunciation pu, which I’ve spelled above as p’us. It’s because the L dropped.

J’sus (pronounced chu) means je suis. J’sus à boutte literally means “I’m at the end,” because boutte means bout, but its figurative meaning is “I’ve had it.” You’ll notice that bout is sometimes pronounced boutte in Québec, especially in informal expressions like the one here; être à boutte, to have had it, to be fed up.

The character who said j’sus à boutte didn’t pronounce it as chu à boutte though. She pronounced it instead as chtàboutte. She shortened chu to ch and slipped in a T sound between ch and à (ch-t-à boutte).

_ _ _

Quotes taken from:
30 vies, saison 5, épisode 24
16 octobre 2014, Radio-Canada

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UNE COUPONNEUSE

In this La Presse article about the use of coupons at Maxi (a supermarket in Québec), we learn that une couponneuse is an avid coupon collector and user.

According to the article (16 June 2013), the majority of couponneuses are women between the ages of 25 and 45:

[…] les accros des coupons, qu’on appelle familièrement les couponneuses (majoritairement des femmes de 25 à 45 ans).

PÉTER UNE COCHE

After writing about the expression être s’a coche, Eva commented that she knew another expression from Québec using the word coche: péter une coche.

This expression means to get angry and “blow a fuse” or “lose it.” Here’s an example of this expression pulled from the Wikébec glossary:

Y’a pété une coche quand y’a coulé son examen.
= Il a pété une coche quand il a coulé son examen.
He lost it when he flunked his exam.

You may also hear sauter une coche used in the same sense.

COULER SON EXAMEN

You’ve already seen the verb couler from the example above (couler son examen) if you’ve read this entire blog. I’ve used examples of it from TV series like Les Parent, La Galère and 30 vies. The kids in these shows talk about flunking at school using the verb couler.

For example, Olivier in Les Parent said this about his maths teacher:

Y fait couler tout le monde!
He flunks everybody!

[Les Parent, season 4, episode 15, Radio-Canada, Montréal, 6 February 2012]

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