Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘affaires croches’

A word that came up in a conversation yesterday was croche. It means “crooked.”

Someone with crooked teeth has les dents croches. If you’ve got les dents croches, you might wear des broches to straighten them.

avoir les dents croches
to have crooked teeth
J’ai les dents croches.

porter des broches
to wear braces
Je porte des broches.

Cynthia Dulude says in her video j’ai eu des broches (0:44) and j’avais pas les dents croches (0:53).

Crossed eyes? That’s avoir les yeux croches. Crooked legs, avoir les jambes croches.

Online, an example of sitting crooked on a seat:

Elle était un peu croche sur son siège.
She was sitting a bit crooked on her seat.

It’s not just bodies and body parts that might be described as croche:

Le siège de mon bateau était un peu croche.
The seat on my boat was a little crooked.

How about this news headline? (Saoul means “drunk,” and it’s pronounced sou.)

Saoul, il demande si la route est croche
[While] drunk, [a driver] asks if the road is crooked

Someone who feels “all crooked” isn’t feeling well, feels out of sorts:

J’me sens tout croche.
I don’t feel good, I don’t feel right, I feel awful, etc.

And if you hear a person described as being un croche, it means just what it sounds like — that person is crooked, a crook (dishonest, thieving, corrupt, etc.).

This headline asks if politicians are crooks:

Des «croches», les politiciens?
Are politicians crooks?

A journalist describes being “messed up in ‘crooked’ (dirty) business” as being mêlé à des affaires croches.

Read Full Post »