Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘appartement’

I saw this sign posted on the side of an apartment building. If you’re looking for an apartment to rent in Montréal, it’s a good idea to learn what everything on this sign means.

appartements à louer
apartments for rent

semi-meublé
partially furnished

poêle et réfrigérateur
stove and refrigerator

chauffé
heating included

eau chaude
hot water included

conciergerie et buanderie sur place
maintenance and laundry room on site

Chauffé doesn’t mean the apartment has heating — all apartments in Montréal have heating because of that thing called winter. Chauffé means the costs associated with heating are included in the amount you’ll pay in rent. You don’t need to pay extra for heating, in other words.

The same goes for eau chaude. It means that you don’t need to pay extra for hot water; it’s included in your rent.

Poêle and réfrigérateur are both masculine words.

The sign uses the word une buanderie, but the laundry room is very often called une salle de lavage.

If semi-meublé on this sign means partially furnished, then meublé means fully furnished. If the apartment isn’t furnished at all, it might say non meublé or nothing at all about furniture.

Le concierge is the person who takes care of the building. For example, if you needed a repair in the apartment, you’d call the concierge.

Not on the sign is the term bureau de location. That’s the rental office. If there’s a bureau de location in the building, that’s where you’ll sign your lease (le bail) and make your rental payments every month.

If an apartment is a (un trois et demie), it’s got 3 rooms + bathroom (½). The number before the half symbol tells how many rooms (not bedrooms!) are in the apartment. Note that a room may be a kitchen, living room or bedroom. The half symbol represents the bathroom. In the case of a 3½, you can expect a bedroom (1), kitchen (1), living room (1) and bathroom (½).

Demie is feminine because the word that’s understood is une pièce (room):

un trois et demie
= un [appartement] trois [pièces] et demie

Read Full Post »

In entry #710 about the pronunciations pis, moé, and toé, I put up an example that happened to use the word drette in it:

Tantôt, j’étais au Subway, pis y’a un monsieur qui s’est étouffé avec son 6 pouces au thon drette à côté de moi.

Earlier on, I was at Subway [a fast-food restaurant], and there was a man who choked on his 6-inch tuna [sandwich] right next to me.

(source: Axe du Mad)

What does drette mean?

Drette is an informal québécois pronunciation of droit. In the example above, drette is the part that means “right” in the English translation.

drette à côté de moi
= juste à côté de moi
= right next to me

Tourne à drette.
= Tourne à droite.
= Turn right.

C’est drette là.
= C’est juste là.
= It’s right there.

Drette là may also be used informally in the sense of tout de suite, immédiatement.

In a Kijiji posting online, someone was trying to get rid of some furniture. The title of the ad was:

Faut que ça parte genre drette là!
It’s gotta go like right now!!

In that example, genre is the part translated as “like.”

In another online posting, someone had an apartment up for rent. The title of the ad was:

Appart à louer presque drette là!
Apartment for rent almost right away!

The final t in appart is pronounced. It’s an informal short form of appartement.

Drette is never used in formal language. It’s at the same level of language as words like moé, toé and icitte. Even if all Québécois understand what drette means, this doesn’t mean that everybody will use it.

Read Full Post »

Méchant beau char

Méchant beau char

In entry #684, a girl exclaimed celui-là est malade! as she pointed to a famous building made of Mega Bloks at a centre d’achats (shopping centre).

Although the literal meaning of malade is “sick,” it meant “awesome” or “amazing” when the girl used it to describe the Mega Bloks display.

Way back in entry #267, Hugo from the television show La Galère uses the word écoeurant to describe his new appart (informal word for “apartment” which sounds like the English word “apart”).

The literal meaning of écoeurant is disgusting, but this word can also take on the meaning “awesome” or “amazing.” So when Hugo says that his appart is écoeurant, he means that it’s amazing… not disgusting!

In La Galère, Hugo also says that he’s going to get une job écoeurante, “an amazing job.”

Ken asks whether méchant has this double meaning as well. Recently, I saw a sign for a lost dog in my neighbourhood. The owner of the dog was offering une méchante grosse récompense to the person who could return his dog to him.

The literal meaning of méchant is “wicked,” but, on the sign for the lost dog, it takes on a positive sense (an amazingly big reward, a wicked big reward).

Celui-là est malade!
That one’s awesome!

un appart écoeurant
an awesome apartment
(and not “a disgusting apartment”)

une job écoeurante
an amazing job
(and not “a disgusting job”)

une méchante grosse récompense
an amazingly big reward

Read Full Post »

On an STM bus, a young man said on débarque ici to a friend sitting beside him, or “let’s get off here.”

A friend offered me a diet Pepsi to drink, un Pepsi diète.

The Pepsi was in a can, en canette.

A doctor that I won’t be seeing anymore had his receptionist call me. She said je ferme votre dossier, or “I’m closing your file.”

A sign at a fast food restaurant said veuillez faire la ligne ici, or “please line up here.”

Two friends wished each other a happy noon lunch break by saying bon midi! and bon lunch! to each other.

I saw a sign in shopping centre that said bon magasinage!, or “happy shopping!”

A Latin American tourist asked her husband what on signs outside buildings in Montréal could possibly mean. It’s the equivalent of a one-bedroom apartment available for rent.

Signs that read logement à louer mean that there’s an apartment available for rent.

The words diète and midi from above are dzidzu words. Diète is pronounced dziète and midi is pronounced midzi.

Read Full Post »