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Posts Tagged ‘bébé’

Carrot slop again? ffffff... chu tanné de t'ça.

Carrot slop again? Pffffff… chu tanné de ça.

In Montréal today, a woman in her 60s said:

Je suis tannée, je suis tannée de t’ça.
I’m fed up, I’m fed up with it.

What’s de t’ça?

It’s an informal pronunciation that you’ll sometimes hear for de ça.

The de t’ part just sounds like de with a t sound on the end, followed by ça, as if it were deutt ça.

It was a woman in her 60s who said de t’ça, but it can be heard in any age group during informal conversations.

You don’t need to start saying de t’ça yourself. Just learn to recognise it. The regular de ça pronunciation works in any language situation, for example: je suis tanné de ça, or more informally: chu tanné de ça.

If you are going to use de t’ça though, keep it for informal language situations.

By the way, the woman really did say je suis, and not the informal contracted forms j’sus (chu) or j’suis (chui).

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The STM is Montréal’s public transportation provider (bus and métro).

In French, the name is feminine: la STM.

Here are 3 things for you to learn in French that I’ve heard said by ruffled STM employees recently.

1. Madame, avec le carrosse!

Madame, with the baby carriage!
(i.e., hey you, with the baby carriage!)

This was shouted angrily by an STM employee in the Montréal métro.

The employee was angered by something a lady pushing a baby carriage had done, so she came running out of her ticket booth and yelled this before the lady could walk off.

I don’t know what the lady had done wrong, but I noticed her baby carriage was empty. Maybe she forgot the bundle of joy at the turnstile or something.

2. Let’s go! Let’s go!

Let’s go! Let’s go!
(i.e., hurry the fuck up, people!)

As people boarded the bus at a busy métro station, this was said by an STM employee standing on the pavement beside the bus door.

This employee was encouraging people to get on the bus faster. There was a long queue of people waiting to get on, and some people were taking their sweet time boarding the bus (as usual).

Obviously this expression is English, but you’ll definitely hear it in French too.

3. Déplacez-vous vers l’arrière, s’il vous plaît!

Please move to the back of the bus!
(i.e., will you people stop blocking the door goddamnit!)

An exasperated driver had to yell this a few times when riders of the bus kept crowding the front portion of the bus. There was room at the back of the bus for more standing passengers.

Sometimes when you board a bus, you’ll have to push your way through a wall of stubborn people all huddled together near the front door.

P.S. My respect to STM employees. I’d get pretty exasperated too if I were one.

Image: Wikipedia

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I always look forward to reading the Montreal-based magazine Urbania.

You may remember this magazine from past entries on OffQc, where Urbania authors have devoted issues to themes like lesbiennes and bébés and the hiver québécois.

Right now I’m enjoying the summer 2012 issue of Urbania, #34.

It’s all about… les Parisiens.

From the magazine:

Reason number 2 of 25 for a Québécois to not feel inferior to a Parisian: Nous autres [les Québécois], nos sacres peuvent se décliner en verbes, en adverbes et en adjectifs.1 (Our swear words can be used as verbs, adverbs and adjectives.)

Reason number 15 of 25 for a Québécois to indeed feel inferior to a Parisian: Nous [les Parisiens], à partir de 16 ans, on range le sac à dos et on l’oublie. À jamais. Surtout avec des talons.2 (After age 16, we put the backpack away and forget about it. Forever. Especially with heels.)

Or this from a young Parisian woman named Marion: Quand je vivais à Montréal et que je m’habillais bien, c’était pour mon mec ou pour des garçons en général. À Paris, je m’habille pour mes copines. C’est elles qui portent un jugement.3 (When I lived in Montreal and would dress well, it was for my boyfriend or for boys in general. In Paris, I dress for my girlfriends. They’re the ones who pass judgement.)

In Quebec, you can find the magazine in kiosks. Here’s a list of places where you can find it in Paris.

This issue isn’t a comparison of the Parisians and Québécois. It’s about Parisians and their city. Some comparisons do come through in the writing, however. If you’re interested in reading about Parisians from an engaging québécois perspective, you’ll enjoy it. This issue is written in the usual Urbania style that makes it a pleasure to read.

Urbania also offers some content online. You can find some links to articles and videos related to this issue here.

Quoted material from Urbania, spécial Parisiens, no. 34, été 2012, Montréal.

1Marie-Andrée Labbé, “25 raisons de ne pas se sentir inférieur devant un Parisien,” p.40.

2Anne-Laure Naumowicz, “25 raisons de se sentir inférieur à un Parisien,” p.41.

3Marion, in an article written by Catherine Perreault-Lessard, “Souper de gonzesses,” p.50.

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In issue 31 of the magazine Urbania (this issue was devoted entirely to the theme of babies), Frédéric Guindon writes about his experience at trying to get his wife pregnant.

He gives a piece of advice:

La première étape quand on veut un enfant, c’est de fourrer.
Souvent et bien.

The F word in this quote is the equivalent of the F word in English.

The author goes on to explain why it’s so important that the sex be good:

If it’s not good sex, les petits spermatomachins will know it, and they’ll crash into the wall instead of going into la boîte magique…

[Quote above by Frédéric Guindon, in “Guindon et fils,” Urbania (Montréal), no. 31, p. 45. To crash into the wall = foncer dans le mur. To go into the magic box = rentrer dans la boîte magique.]

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The autumn edition of the magazine Urbania (numéro 31) was devoted entirely to the theme of babies. And of course the first thing that comes to mind when you think of babies is caca.

They even devoted two pages to analysing the contents of a diaper to determine how well bébé is doing.

Vert-brun, brun dur et sec, jaune foncé, noir, brun aqueux… author Julie Chaumont explained the meaning of all these cacas (and more), by their odour, consistency, frequency, ingredients and quantity.

I can’t go through all of the descriptions here, so we’ll just take a peek at the caca that Julie describes as jaune moutarde, doré, parfois tacheté vert. This poop is the result of a baby who’s been breastfed.

She describes the odour of this caca in these terms:

Douce, pas désagréable. Mon chum dit que ça sent la bouffe du McDo.

Douce (and not doux), because she’s describing the odeur of the caca. Odeur is feminine. She explains that her chum (it’s not clear what their marital status is!) says that this poo smells like the food (la bouffe) from McDonalds (McDo).

With yesterday’s entry about the food at Valentine, I think that I’ve served you enough fast food these past two days. Except this time it’s much messier because the author says that these cacas peuvent exploser et sortir […] de tous côtés de la couche…

[Quote above by Julie Chaumont, in “Les deux mains dedans,” Urbania (Montréal), no. 31, p. 54.]

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