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Posts Tagged ‘blonde’

I grabbed a handful of usages that have appeared on OffQc since post #1000 and put them in a cloud. Can you explain to yourself how each one might be used? You can click on the image for a larger version.

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In the 1000 Québécois French PDF that you can buy here or read more about first here, there’s an example sentence (#24) that reads:

J’viens d’me faire une blonde.

Une blonde is a girlfriend. Literally, this sentence translates as I’ve just made myself a girlfriend, but it can be used where you might say in English something like I’m going out with someone new, I’ve got a new girlfriend.

The expression here is se faire une blonde.

A similar expression very good to know is se faire des amis, to make friends. In French, you make yourself some friends, so don’t forget to use se faire here.

Je n’arrive pas à me faire des amis.
I can’t make friends.
I’m having trouble making friends.

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On a wall in a shopping centre in Montréal, I came across these blocks of text providing reasons to go shopping there. Let’s look at two of them.

 

C’est la fête de ma blonde.
It’s my girlfriend’s birthday.

Sushi avec la gang du bureau.
Sushi with the office crew.

Fête can be used to refer to a birthday. C’est ma fête aujourd’hui, for example, means it’s my birthday today. C’est la fête de ma blonde means it’s my girlfriend’s birthday, where une blonde is a girlfriend. Un gâteau de fête is a birthday cake. Bonne fête! Happy birthday!

Une blonde is a girlfriend, and un chum is a boyfriend. Blonde and chum might also be used to refer to a spouse. On the Wikitionnaire page for blonde, we find this usage note:

Traditionnellement, au Québec, les mots chum et blonde servent à désigner l’ami et l’amie de cœur, par opposition à mari/femme, époux/épouse ou conjoint/conjointe pour les couples mariés. Toutefois, depuis les années 1990, il est fréquent d’entendre des couples mariés utiliser les mots chum et blonde pour désigner le conjoint. Ce phénomène est attribuable à une image «vieux jeu» du mariage et à une volonté de ne pas révéler clairement si le couple est officiellement marié ou non. Cet usage est assez fréquent mais critiqué par certains qui le voient comme une dévalorisation du mariage.

In short, it says that chum and blonde were traditionally used to refer to boyfriends and girlfriends; however, since the 1990s, some married couples may also use them to avoid revealing their marital status or because other terms, like mari and femme, strike them as sounding old-fashioned. Some people see this usage as a corrosion of values regarding marriage.

Gang here is a feminine noun pronounced like its English equivalent. It can be used to refer to a group of friends (e.g., sortir avec la gang). La gang du bureau is an informal way to refer to one’s office co-workers.

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In the last post, we saw an example of the Québécois verb gosser.

Let’s take a closer look at how the verb gosser can be used in the sense of “to bug someone” or “to give someone a rough time.”

Here are some good examples pulled from a quick Google search:

Au secondaire tu n’arrêtais pas de me gosser avec ça! In secondary school, you always bugged me about that!

Mon propriétaire est un vieux pervers dégueu qui arrête pas de me gosser. The owner is a disgusting, old pervert who keeps bugging me.

Ma blonde arrêtait pas de me gosser pour en acheter une. My girlfriend kept bugging me to buy one.

In the last entry, Rabii Rammal used se faire gosser instead. If gosser quelqu’un means “to give someone a rough time,” then se faire gosser means “to be given a rough time” by someone. Rammal wrote:

Tous, homme ou femme, ont le droit de ne pas se faire gosser dans la rueEverybody, male or female, has the right to not be bothered in the street.

Here are a few more examples pulled from a Google search:

Je me faisais gosser par les infirmières à l’hôpital pour que mes garçons boivent aux 3 heures. I was bugged by the nurses at the hospital to get my boys to drink every 3 hours.

Je me suis fait gosser par un policier. I was given a rough time by a policeman.

J’haïs tellement ça me faire gosser par un vendeur! I hate it so much when salesmen bug me!

Tips: Aux trois (quatre, cinq…) heures means “every three (four, five…) hours.” J’haïs is pronounced ja-i.

In short:

gosser quelqu’un
to give someone a rough time

se faire gosser par quelqu’un
to be given a rough time by someone

The verb gosser has even more uses than just the ones here. Let’s leave that for a future post…

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Here’s a fictitious text message conversation between two brothers (Zak and Oli) taken from the Québécois television comedy Les Parent.

You can click on the phone to enlarge it.

Oli, es-tu réveillé?
Oli, are you awake?

Ouais… Pas capable de dormir.
Yeah… Can’t sleep.

Lol! Moi non plus. J’entends ronfler jusque dans ma chambre.
Lol! Neither can I. I can hear the snoring all the way in my room.

Je sais. Imagine quand tu dors dans le même lit.
I know. Imagine what it’s like when you sleep in the same bed.

Yark! Grand-p’pa devrait clairement se faire opérer les fosses nasales! Lol!
Yuck! Granddad obviously needs to get his nostrils operated! Lol!

Heu… C’est ma blonde qui ronfle.
Uh… It’s my girlfriend who’s snoring.

Notes

Réveillé means “awoken” (awoken from sleep). Debout means “up” (physically out of bed).

Learn the difference between moi aussi and moi non plus. Moi aussi means “me too.” Moi non plus means “me neither.”

— J’aime ça. I like that.
— Moi aussi. So do I.

— J’aime pas ça. I don’t like that.
— Moi non plus. Neither do I.

Capable often sounds like capab’ when it’s pronounced informally. Chu pas capab’ de dormir. I can’t sleep.

Une blonde is used in Québec for “girlfriend.”

This show is called Les Parent and not Les Parents. Parent is the family’s surname. The title translated into English is “The Parent Family.”

In French, you never put an s on a surname in the plural, no matter what the ethnic background: les Tremblay, les Rossi, les Jackson.

Because this comedy deals with the trials of being a parent, the title is in fact also a play on words (les Parent sounds like les parents).

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