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Posts Tagged ‘café’

When paying the cashier in a store or restaurant, you’ll probably be asked a question or two. Here are 8 typical questions often heard in Québec, to help you be better prepared.

1. Avez-vous la carte de points?
Do you have the points card? Different stores have different names for their points card. At Pharmaprix, for example, it’s called la carte Optimum. Avez-vous la carte Optimum?

2. Voulez-vous la facture?
Do you want the receipt? At fast food restaurants, many customers don’t want the receipt, so cashiers have a habit of asking if you want it. In Montréal, the receipt is most often called une facture, and much more rarely un reçu.

3. Voulez-vous un sac?
Do you want a bag? Because many stores are now in the practice of charging their customers for plastic bags, you may be asked if you want one.

4. C’est tout? Ça va être tout? C’est complet?
Will that be all? We looked at these questions recently here. You might be asked one of these questions at a fast food restaurant. (You can review how to order in French at Tim Hortons here and at McDonalds here.)

5. C’est pour ici ou pour emporter?
Is it for here or to go? You can answer this question with pour ici (for here) or pour emporter (to go). Other times, the question might be asked as c’est pour ici? or c’est pour manger ici?, in which case you can answer with either oui or non, (c’est) pour emporter.

6. Voulez-vous un cabaret?
Do you want a tray? If you’ve ordered food, you might be asked if you want a tray to carry it on. In Montréal, a tray is most often called un cabaret. You might also hear it called un plateau, but this term is more likely to be used by francophones who aren’t from Québec.

7. Voulez-vous un cabaret de transport?
Do you want a coffee tray / a tray for the drinks? This is a smaller kind of tray, usually made of cardboard, used for carrying take-away cups of coffee or other drinks. There’s an image of a cabaret de transport here. In that same post, you’ll also discover (or review) what coffee cup sleeves are called in French, in case you want to ask for one.

8. Avez-vous dix sous?
Have you got a dime? When paying a cashier, you might be asked for five cents (cinq sous, cinq cennes), ten cents (dix sous, dix cennes) or twenty-five cents (vingt-cinq sous, vingt-cinq cennes) to facilitate making your change. For example, if you owe 4,10 $ (quatre et dix) and you pay with a five-dollar bill, you might be asked for ten cents (avez-vous dix sous?) so that your change will consist simply of a one-dollar coin (une piasse, in colloquial language), rather than a number of coins totalling 90 cents.

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Get caught up: The OffQc book 1000 Québécois French is a condensed version of all the language that appeared in the first 1000 posts on OffQc. You can buy and download it here.

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When ordering food at the counter of a fast food restaurant, café, etc., you’ll often be asked an equivalent in French of “is that all?” after saying the items you want.

We’ve seen one way already: c’est tout? This was used in the post about ordering in French at Tim Hortons.

A second way, also used in that post, is ça va être tout?

There’s a third way, which we haven’t seen yet: c’est complet?

— Bonjour, je vais prendre une boîte de 10 Timbits mélangés et un petit café, s’il vous plaît. Hello, I’ll take a box of 10 assorted Timbits and a small coffee, please. 
— Qu’est-ce qu’on met dans le café? What would you like in the coffee?
— Deux crèmes. Two creams.
— C’est complet? Will that be all?
Oui. Yes.
— C’est pour ici ou pour emporter? Is it for here or to go?
— Pour emporter. To go.

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Get caught up: The OffQc book 1000 Québécois French is a condensed version of all the language that appeared in the first 1000 posts on OffQc. You can buy and download it here.

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Timbits

These are called Timbits; they’re sold at Tim Hortons

After looking at the Québécois names for trays and coffee cup sleeves in #1013, maybe it wouldn’t be a bad idea to look again at ways of ordering coffee itself, as well as a few other food items.

A lot of people land on OffQc looking for help with ordering at Tim Hortons in particular because of road trips, so that’s what we’ll go with here. The coffee at Tim Hortons is filter coffee, and people usually add milk, cream or sugar to it, which is why the cups are so big. The coffee is usually served in a paper cup.

I’ve written some sample exchanges below. The prices are just made up. I’ve tried to include a variety of ways of ordering here, trying to imagine the situations you might find yourself in and the different usages you might hear.

— Passez ici! (…) Bonsoir.
— Bonsoir, un moyen deux-deux, s’il vous plaît.
— C’est pour ici ou pour emporter?
— Pour emporter.
— C’est tout?
— Oui, c’est tout.
— Ça fait une et cinquante.

— Next! (…) Good evening.
— Good evening, a medium double-double, please.
— Is it for here or to go?
— To go.
— Will that be all?
— Yes, that’s all.
— That’ll be one fifty.

— Passez ici!
— Bonjour, je vais prendre un petit café, s’il vous plaît.
— Qu’est-ce qu’on met dedans?
— Un lait, un sucre.
— Ensuite?
— C’est tout.
— Une et vingt-cinq, s’il vous plaît. (…) C’est juste à côté pour votre café. Ça sera pas long.
— OK, merci.
— Passez une bonne journée.

— Next!
— Hi, I’ll take a small coffee, please.
— How do you take it?
— One milk, one sugar.
— Will that be all?
— That’s it.
— One twenty-five, please. (…) Your coffee will be just off to the side. It won’t be long (in coming).
— OK, thanks.
— Have a good day.

— Suivant! (…) Bonjour, monsieur.
— Bonjour, ça va être un moyen café une crème, un sucre; un petit café noir; un grand deux-deux; et un moyen deux crèmes, pas de sucre.
— Ensuite?
— C’est tout.
— Sept et soixante, s’il vous plaît. (…) C’est pour emporter?
— Oui.
— Voulez-vous un cabaret de transport?
— Oui, s’il vous plaît.

— Next! (…) Hello, sir.
— Hello, I’ll take a medium coffee one cream, one sugar; a small black coffee; a large double-double; and a medium with two creams, no sugar.
— Anything else?
— That’s it.
— Seven sixty, please. (…) Is it to go?
— Yes.
— Would you like a take-out/take-away tray?
— Yes, please.

— Suivant!
— Bonjour, un grand café deux crèmes, deux sucres.
— Autre chose?
— Oui, une boîte de vingt Timbits.
— Avez-vous une préférence (pour les Timbits)?
— Non… mélangés.
— Autre chose?
— C’est tout.
— Quatre et trente-cinq, s’il vous plaît. (…) Voulez-vous la facture?
— Non, merci.
— Merci à vous, bonne journée.

— Next!
— Hello, a large coffee with two creams, two sugars.
— Anything else?
— Yes, a box of twenty Timbits.
— Do you have a preference (i.e., for which Timbits you want)?
— No… mixed.
— Anything else?
— That’s all.
— Four thirty-five, please. (…) Do you want the receipt?
— No, thank you.
— Thank you, good day.

— Passez ici!
— Bonjour, je prendrais une demi-douzaine de beignes, s’il vous plaît.
— Mélangés?
— Oui.
— Ensuite?
— Un moyen café corsé.
— On met quoi dedans?
— Noir, s’il vous plaît.
— Ensuite?
— Un bagel plein goût avec du fromage à la crème.
— Grillé?
— Oui.
— 
Est-ce qu’on met du beurre?
— Non, pas de beurre.
— Autre chose?
— Une brioche à la cannelle deux fois.
— Ça va être tout?
— Oui, merci.
— Dix et cinquante.

— Next!
— Hi, I’ll take a half-dozen donuts, please.
— Mixed?
— Yes.
— Anything else?
— A medium dark roast.
— With what in it? (i.e., how do you take it?)
— Black, please.
— Anything else?
— An Everything bagel with cream cheese.
— Toasted?
— Yes.

— With butter?
— No, no butter.
— Anything else?
— Two cinnamon buns.
— Will that be all?
— Yes, thanks.
— Ten fifty.

Well, that should get you unstuck out of a few situations at any rate!

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Updates:

  • An iced cappuccino is called un cappuccino glacé on the menu, but most people just call it an iced capp when they order, which sounds like ice cap (aïss capp). If you wanted a small iced capp, for example, you can ask for un petit iced capp.
  • The breakfast sandwich is called le Timatin (which comes from Tim + matin and is also a wordplay on ti-matin, p’tit matin).
  • A danish is une danoise; a muffin is un muffin.
  • For the donut names, check what they’re called on the little signs under each one when you’re ordering. If you want more than one of something, you can use deux fois, trois fois, etc. For example, if you’re choosing a dozen donuts, you could say glacé au chocolat, trois fois if you wanted three chocolate dip donuts.
  • Asking for a deux-deux means you want two creams and two sugars in your coffee. You can also say deux crèmes, deux sucres. When you ask for a deux-deux, you’ll always get cream and sugar, never milk and sugar.

Continue reading: How to order at McDonalds in French when in Québec

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I’m in a café. There’s free WiFi here, or WiFi gratuit.

In Québec, the pronunciation of WiFi follows the English pronunciation.

There’s a kid near me reading a Wikipédia article on his laptop about le bouclier canadien, the Canadian Shield.

In Québec, the adjective canadien is dzidzuated. It’s pronounced ca-na-dzien.

Wikipédia is also dzidzuated. It’s pronounced wi-ki-pé-dzia.

I’m looking out the window. It looks like it’s going to rain.

The verb “to rain” is pleuvoir in French. You’ll also sometimes hear it said as mouiller in Québec.

Il pleut and il mouille mean the same thing. If you hear someone say y mouille, that’s an informal pronunciation of il mouille.

Today is Labour Day, la fête du Travail.

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Fido is a mobile phone company.

— Bonjour. Un café, s’il vous plaît.
— Pour un café régulier, dites régulier. Pour un cappuccino, dites cappuccino. Pour un café latte, dites café latte.
— Café latte?…
— Vous avez dit tasse de thé. Pour confirmer votre choix, dites oui.
— Euh, non… non…
— Vous avez dit tasse de thé.

Chez Fido, on sait que vous détestez parler à une machine. C’est pourquoi nos conseillers sont plus faciles à joindre quand vous nous appelez. Avec Fido à l’écoute, vous aimerez votre Fido.

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