Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘case’

Assurez-vous de bien barrer votre vélo.

Un conseil : Assurez-vous de bien barrer votre vélo.

At the marché Jean-Talon in Montréal, a yellow sign advises bike owners to lock up their bikes:

Assurez-vous de bien barrer votre vélo. Be sure to lock your bike securely.

Do you remember from earlier posts on OffQc that the Québécois also sometimes call a bike un bécik at the informal level of language?

Bécik entered the language via English. It’s how the Québécois pronounce bicycle.

Barrer is used in Québec in the sense of “to lock up.” It’s pronounced bâré. The â sound comes close to the “aww” sound of English.

The verb barrer appeared in this list of 50 words pronounced with the â sound in Québec, but not written with the accented â.

barrer la porte
to lock the door

barrer son vélo
to lock one’s bike

barrer son bécik
to lock one’s bike
[this one sounds especially québécois]

You can use barrer to talk about locking any kind of door: a house door, bathroom door, bedroom door, shop door, etc.

barrer sa case
barrer son casier
to lock one’s locker

Both case and casier also appeared in the list of 50 â-sound words. They’re pronounced câz and câzié in Québec.

barrer sa case avec un cadenas
barrer son casier avec un cadenas
to lock one’s locker with a padlock

The second a in cadenas also uses the â sound. That darn â sound is all over the place! The Québécois pronounce those last two examples as:

bâré sa câz avec un cadnâ
bâré son câzié avec un cadnâ

Just behind the sign in that same image, we see a bike locked up to a rack. What’s the term used in Québec for a bike rack?

A sign in the marché Jean-Talon (see below) shows us one way to say “bike rack” in French:

un support à vélo
a bike rack

The term support à vélo (or support à vélos) is standard Québécois French. But during spontaneous conversations, you might also hear:

un rack à vélo
un rack à bécik
[these both sound especially québécois; the second one in particular is guaranteed to make your French teacher’s skin go all goose pimply]

A rack for bikes is called “un support” in French, but you’ll also hear “un rack.”

Read Full Post »

L'accent québécoisThe â sound is one of the most distinctive features of the québécois accent.

You can always identify a French speaker from Québec by listening for the â sound!

The sound made by â in Québec sounds something like “aww” to an English speaker.

To hear â pronounced, listen to Ricardo pronounce carré, or hear Martin Matte pronounce câline and passait. All three of these words use the â sound.

The â sound occurs in words written with the accented â (like âge and fâché), but it can occur in certain words written with an unaccented letter a too (like tasse and case).

When the word is written with the accented â, there’s little doubt — say aww! But when it’s written with an unaccented letter a, it isn’t as obvious if it takes the â sound. That said, you may begin to notice some patterns.

To help you out a bit, below are 50 words taking the â sound in Québec but all written with an unaccented letter a. I’ve underlined the letter a in each word that makes the â sound.

This list isn’t exhaustive, it’s just a list of 50 words that I felt were useful.

  1. amasser
  2. barrage
  3. barreau
  4. barrer
  5. barrière
  6. bas
  7. base
  8. baser
  9. basse
  10. brassage
  11. brasser
  12. brasserie
  13. carré
  14. carreau
  15. carrément
  16. cas
  17. case
  18. casier
  19. casse-croûte
  20. casser
  21. chat
  22. classe
  23. classement
  24. classer
  25. classeur
  26. dépasser
  27. entasser
  28. espace
  29. gars
  30. gaz
  31. gazer
  32. gazeux
  33. jaser
  34. jasette
  35. matelas
  36. paille
  37. pas
  38. passage
  39. passager
  40. passe
  41. passeport
  42. passer
  43. ramassage
  44. ramasser
  45. rasage
  46. raser
  47. surpasser
  48. tas
  49. tasse
  50. tasser

Remember, the letters rs in gars aren’t pronounced. This word sounds like gâ. The final s in bas, cas, matelas, pas, tas is silent. These words sound like bâ, câ, matlâ, pâ, tâ.

Read Full Post »