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Posts Tagged ‘chu’

I came across this short clip taken from a show by comedian Korine Côté.

Her words were transcribed by a YouTube user in this video that he’s created and posted online, but I’ve written them out below.

In the video, c’est sûre should be c’est sûr.

Moi, moi j’ai un Mac. Ah ouais, j’ai un Mac, ah ouais. Ah, j’peux faire du montage vidéo sans problèmes, ah ouais. Bon, j’en fais pas, mais j’pourrais, ouais, parce que… parce que j’ai un Mac. Ah ouais, ah ouais. Ah! t’as pogné un virus? Ahh! Moi, j’pogne pas ça avec mon Mac, ah non!… [j’]pogne pas ça des virus avec mon Mac. Bon, c’est sûr j’su’s pas compatible avec le 7/8 de la planète, mais c’pas grave.

Me, I’ve got a Mac. Oh yeah, I’ve got a Mac, oh yeah. Oh, I can edit videos (make videos montages), no problem, oh yeah. Fine, I don’t actually do it, but I could (if I wanted to), yeah, because… because I’ve got a Mac. Oh yeah, oh yeah. Oh! You got a virus? Arg! Me, I don’t get them with my Mac, nope! Don’t get viruses with my Mac. Fine, it’s true I’m not compatible with 7/8 of the planet, but no big deal.

pogner, informal verb meaning to catch, grab
pogner un virus, to get a virus, catch a virus
j’pogne (sounds like ch’pogne), informal contraction of je pogne
t’as, informal contraction of tu as
j’su’s pas (sounds like chu pas), informal contraction of je ne suis pas
c’pas (sounds like s’pas), informal contraction of ce n’est pas

This video will be added to the Listen to Québécois French section.

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In the videos I’ve posted to OffQc lately, quite a few informal contractions have come up. It’s imperative to learn these contractions to understand spoken French.

I’ve pulled together a list of these contractions; there’s a link for each one that will take you back to the video where it appeared so you can listen again and learn it.

Here’s something you can try. The sentences below have been written without contractions. Try to say them aloud applying whatever informal contractions are possible from the ones above.

Je suis bien content.
Tu n’es pas tanné?
Je l’ai croisée sur la rue.
Des fois je me fâche.
Il y en a qui disent ça.

Answers

J’su’ ben [chu bin] content. I’m really happy.
T’es pas tanné? You’re not fed up?
Je l’ai croisée s’a rue. I bumped into her in the street.
Des fois j’me fâche. Sometimes I get angry.
Y’en a qui disent ça. Some people say that.

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We’ve seen that je suis can contract in informal language to what sounds like chu or chui. But where does that ch sound come from in chu and chui, considering there isn’t any ch sound in je suis to begin with?

To get the pronunciation chui, je suis contracts to j’suis. Je loses its vowel sound, and the resulting j’s makes the French ch sound. The same thing happens with chu, which is je suis contracted to j’su’s.

So the ch sound comes from j’s.

This is why je sais contracted informally to j’sais sounds like ché. It’s also why je sois contracted to j’sois sounds like choi. Je savais contracted to j’savais sounds like chavais. Anywhere you have the informally contracted j’s, you have the ch sound.

Cynthia Dulude uses the pronunciations j’su’s (chu) and j’sois (choi) in one of her videos in the Listen section.

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Yesterday we looked at how je suis can contract when the next word begins with a vowel. For example, je suis en maudit can contract to j’t’en maudit, where j’t’en sounds like ch’t’en.

Let’s look at another informal contraction containing je now.

Je me suis can contract to j’me su’s (sounds like jme su).

J’me su’s posé une question.
I asked myself a question.

C’est bon, que j’me su’s dit.
It’s good, I said to myself.

J’me su’s payé la traite.
I treated myself.

J’me su’s couché tard.
I went to bed late.

Review. Say what all of the following are informal contractions of:

  • j’t’en (sounds like ch’t’en)
  • j’t’à (sounds like ch’t’à)
  • j’t’un (sounds like ch’t’un)
  • j’t’allé (sounds like ch’t’allé)
  • j’pas (sounds like ch’pas)
  • j’me su’ (sounds like jme su)

Answers

  • je suis en
  • je suis à
  • je suis un
  • je suis allé
  • je (ne) suis pas
  • je me suis

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We’ve seen how je suis can contract to what sounds like chu at the informal level of language. But when the next word after chu begins with a vowel, an additional change can occur.

The expression en maudit, for example, means mad as hell, pissed off. Je suis en maudit. I’m mad as hell. I’m pissed off.

But when we apply an informal pronunciation to je suis en maudit, it can sound like ch’t’en maudit. What’s going on here?

The ch sound in ch’t’en is a contraction of je suis. Then a t sound is slipped in before en, which begins with a vowel.

So that’s how je suis en can end up being pronounced as ch’t’en, which you might see written informally as j’t’en.

Can you now say how the following might sound informally?

Je suis en train de…
I’m in the process of…

Je suis en forme.
I’m in shape.

Je suis en burn-out.
I’m burnt out. (Burn-out is pronounced as in English but with the stress on the last syllable.)

Je suis à boutte!
I’ve had it!

Quand je suis arrivé à Montréal…
When I arrived in Montréal…

Je suis allé fumer une cigarette.
I went to smoke a cigarette.

Answers
ch’t’en train de
ch’t’en forme
ch’t’en burn-out
ch’t’à boutte
quand ch’t’arrivé
ch’t’allé fumer

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