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Posts Tagged ‘correct’

We’ve seen many times on OffQc how ben can be used in the sense of “very” or “really.”

Ben is an informal reduction of bien. It sounds like bain. A better spelling would be bin, and you will in fact sometimes see that. Ben is more common though, and that’s what I’ll use here.

C’est ben loin.
It’s really far.

C’est ben bon.
It’s really good.

C’est ben correct.
It’s really fine.
It’s really no problem.

Remember, ben is used in regular, everyday speaking encounters or informal writing situations (Facebook updates, for example). It’s not used in formal writing. If you see ben used in literature, it’s most likely to only be used in the dialogue portions of the text.

Sometimes you’ll hear ben repeated for emphasis. Some examples pulled from Google results:

C’est ben ben l’fun.
It’s just so much fun.

C’est ben ben plate.
It’s just so boring.

C’est ben ben cute à voir.
It’s just so cute to see.
(Cute is pronounced kioute.)

You’ll also hear it used in pas ben ben:

C’est pas ben ben utile.
It’s really not all that useful.

J’ai pas ben ben le choix.
I really don’t have much of a choice.

C’est pas ben ben clair.
It’s really not all that clear.

Y se force pas ben ben (pour apprendre le français, etc.).
He really doesn’t make much of an effort (to learn French, etc.).

You see? C’est pas ben ben compliqué.

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Je tripe fort sur les orignaux de jardin!

Je tripe fort sur les orignaux de jardin!

Review time!

Here are 51 example sentences to file away in the folder marked Québécois French in your head. Note: Some of these sentences are for a mature audience only and blah blah blah, this is OffQc.

Credit where credit is due — a very large number of these example sentences are heavily inspired by Maude Schiltz and the colloquial language found in her book Ah shit, j’ai pogné le cancer (tome 1).

I’ve included notes where I thought it would be helpful.

All of these example sentences feel like the sort of things you could say in everyday language situations with people you know well. These are not examples of formal language.

There’s an exception though, and that’s number 33. This example sentence isn’t strictly informal.

Are you getting excited? I am! We’re only a few posts away from #800, which means post #1000 will soon be poking its head on the horizon!

1. Je tripe fort sur les orignaux de jardin!
I’m totally crazy about garden moose!

Or should that be “garden meese”?
The singular of orignaux is orignal.

2. Y a été assez poche avec moi.
He was pretty bad to me.

Y a is an informal way of saying il a.
Y a sounds like yâ.

3. Là, ça va faire!
OK, that’s enough!
Right, enough is enough!

means “now,” but “now” doesn’t sound right in the translation here.

4. J’ai pris mes cliques pis mes claques.
I grabbed all my stuff.

Pis is pronounced pi.
Pis means “and” here.
You can use this expression when getting all your stuff together to move out quickly or when you’re being kicked out, for example.

5. J’ai sacré mon camp.
I got the hell outta there.

Camp is pronounced like quand.

6. Je commence à badtriper là-dessus.
I’m starting to freak out about it.

Badtriper is pronounced bade-tripé.
Use badtriper to talk about freaking out in a bad way (stress, worry, etc.).

7. C’t’une joke, capote pas!
I’m just kidding, calm down!

C’t’une is an informal pronunciation of c’est une.
C’t’une sounds like stune.
Use capoter to talk about losing one’s calm.

8. Je tripe là-dessus solide.
I’m totally crazy about it.

9. Chu down depuis hier.
I feel down since yesterday.

Chu is an informal pronunciation of je suis.
Down
is pronounced like its English equivalent.

10. Y mérite que je le câlisse là.
He deserves for me to fuckin’ dump him.

Y is an informal pronunciation of il.

11. Chu sorti avec ma gang de bureau.
I went out with my group from the office.

Chu is an informal pronunciation of je suis.
Gang
sounds like its English equivalent.

12. C’est ben correct si t’aimes pas ça.
It’s perfectly fine if you don’t like it.

Correct is pronounced informally as correc.

13. On s’est quitté sur une note poche.
We left each other on a bad note.

14. J’ai pogné mon chum à cruiser des filles.
I caught my boyfriend going after girls.

Cruiser is pronounced crouzé.

15. Ça, c’est le boutte le fun!
That’s the fun part!

Boutte is an informal pronunciation of bout.

16. Je file tout croche.
I feel bad. I don’t feel well.

17. J’ai pété une sale coche.
I lost my temper big time.

Péter is pronounced pèté.

18. J’ai tripé en crisse.
I had a hell of a great time.

19. Je trouve que c’est de la bullshit.
I think that’s bullshit.

Bullshit is pronounced boulechitte.

20. Y pogne avec les filles.
He’s lucky with girls. Girls find him hot.

Y is an informal pronunciation of il.

21. Le timing a pas été bon.
The timing wasn’t good.

22. J’ai de la misère à le croire.
I’m having a hard time believing him.

23. J’ai fait freaker tout le monde.
I freaked everybody out.

Freaker is pronounced friquer.

24. J’ai pogné un down.
I’m feeling really down.

Down is pronounced like its English equivalent.

25. T’es vraiment magané ce matin.
You’re in really rough shape this morning.

T’es is an informal contraction of tu es.
T’es
sounds like té.

26. J’ai la chienne de me faire mal.
I’m terrified of getting hurt.

27. Y est carrément épeurant, ce gars-là.
He’s downright scary, that guy.

Y est is an informal pronunciation of il est.
Y est sounds like yé.
Carrément is pronounced cârrément.
Gars is pronounced gâ.

28. T’es cheap en maudit, toi!
You’re so damn cheap!

T’es is an informal contraction of tu es.
T’es
sounds like té.
Cheap here is used in the sense of not liking to spend money.

29. Tu te fais bullshitter solide.
You’re getting played solid, lied to big time.
He (she, they, etc.) is totally bullshitting you.

Bullshitter is pronounced boulechitté.

30. Je file cheap en maudit.
I feel so damn bad.

Cheap sounds like its English equivalent.
Cheap here is used in the sense of feeling like a low-life.

31. C’est pour le fun!
It’s just for fun!

32. Chu raqué et j’ai mal à la gorge.
I’m sore all over and I have a sore throat.

Chu is an informal pronunciation je suis.

33. Le brigadier scolaire a fait traverser des écoliers.
The crossing guard helped some schoolchildren to cross.

34. Le français québécois, c’est tripant!
Québécois French is such a blast!

35. On m’a booké un rendez-vous.
They booked me an appointment.

Booker is pronounced bouké.

36. Y a pogné le creux de la vague.
He’s down in the dumps.

Y a is an informal pronunciation of il a.
Y a sounds like yâ.

37. Arrête de m’écoeurer avec ça.
Stop nagging me about that.
Stop driving me nuts about that.

38. La semaine s’annonce rough.
Looks like a rough week ahead.

Rough is pronounced roffe.

39. T’es full pas de classe, toi.
You’re so unclassy.

T’es is an informal contraction of tu es.
T’es
sounds like té.
Full sounds like foule.

40. Je file pas ben pantoute.
I don’t feel good at all.

41. Shit, tu viens de passer sur la rouge!
Shit, you just went through a red (light)!

Sur la is often pronounced informally as s’a.

42. Peux-tu checker ça avec ton patron?
Can you check that with your boss?

Checker sounds like the English word “check” followed by é.

43. Es-tu game de faire ça demain?
Are you up for doing it tomorrow?

Game sounds like its English equivalent.

44. T’es aussi ben de l’appeler aujourd’hui.
You better call him today.

T’es is an informal contraction of tu es.
T’es
sounds like té.

45. Crisse-moi patience!
Leave me the hell alone!

46. Ces produits sont pleins de chnoute.
These products are full of crap.

47. Le médecin m’a gelé ben comme faut.
The doctor drugged me up good.

Ben comme faut is an informal way of saying bien comme il faut.

48. Chu vraiment tanné d’entendre ça.
I’m really sick of hearing that.

Chu is an informal pronunciation je suis.

49. Des livres, j’en ai un char pis une barge.
I’ve got heaps and heaps of books.

Pis is pronounced pi.
Pis means “and” here.

50. C’est un crisse de gros cave.
He’s a huge goddamn idiot.

Don’t mistakenly pronounce cave like an English word.
Cave is a French word and rhymes with bave.

51. On l’a pogné à se crosser sur la job.
They caught him jerking off on the job.

Sur la is often pronounced informally as s’a.

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Here are 5 new examples of French from around Montréal.

1. Bonjour, bonjour, rebonjour!

A guy who I bumped into twice within the space of about 15 minutes rebonjoured me with rebonjour! It’s a playful usage and, as you probably guessed, it means “hello again.”

2. Vous voulez vous asseoir?

If you’re on the bus or métro, you can offer your seat to someone who needs it more than you with this question.

3. L’avenir appartient à ceux qui se réveillent.

I didn’t hear this, I saw it. It’s from a promotional poster for an energy drink displayed in dépanneurs around Montréal.

“The future belongs to those who wake up.”

The poster is really about waking up by drinking the energy drink. But if we ignore that, it conveys a nice message about just waking up early in general. For us late-risers, it’s good to be reminded to wake up every now and again.

4. Tabarouette!

This is a milder version of tabarnak. It sounds like “tabarwett.” It’s maybe similar to “jeez” or “darn it” in English.

5. Es-tu correct?

As I passed in front of a hotel entrance, an employee was carrying the bags and suitcase of a guest at the hotel. Another employee asked him if he could manage on his own by saying es-tu correct? (are you OK?). Informally, you’ll hear correct pronounced as correc.

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It’s been a while since we’ve looked at some French language from the TV show Les Parent. Let’s look at a scene from season 5, where we come across the québécois usages épeurant, moumoune and ben correct.

The scene:

Louis Parent has received his cousin Kevin Parent as a guest at his place. (Kevin is played by real-life singer Kevin Parent.)

During Kevin’s stay, a character called Marie takes a liking to him. Marie is a friend of the Parent family. She wants to watch a scary movie with Kevin late at night hoping to put the moves on him.

When Marie is alone in the living room with Kevin, she begins to flirt, using the subject of the scary movie that she’s about to see as her excuse:

Est-ce que c’est très épeurant comme film? Parce que moi j’suis vraiment moumoune.
Is it a really scary movie? Because I’m a real scaredy-cat.

Kevin doesn’t seem to be into Marie. He responds:

Non, c’est un peu dur, mais c’est pas vraiment épeurant. Tu vas être ben correcte.
No, it’s a bit rough but it’s not really scary. You’re gonna be just fine.

épeurant, scary
moumoune*, scaredy-cat, wimp, sissy
ben correct, just fine

*A note about une moumoune:

In the quote above, Marie used moumoune as an adjective to refer to herself as someone who gets scared easily. This word can become offensive if a gay male is referred to as une moumoune.

[Language taken from Les Parent, “Kevin qui vient dîner,” season 5, episode 1, Radio-Canada, Montréal, 17 September 2012.]

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Here are three overheard phrases in French contributed by some unsuspecting strangers in Montréal.

1. Non, non, non, c’est correct.
No, no, no, it’s okay.

Correct is frequently used in the sense of OK. You’ll often hear it pronounced “correc” in everyday language. In this example, you can imagine a situation where someone is apologising to another person. That other person, who wants to reassure that it’s no big deal and not necessary to apologise, might say non, non, non, c’est correct.

2. C’est juste pour savoir.
I’m just curious.

Maybe you want to ask someone a question — it’s not really an important question, but you’re curious to know the answer anyway. You might say something like c’est pas vraiment important, c’est juste pour savoir.

3. Bonjour, ça va être un petit café.
Hi, can I get a small coffee?

A customer ordered a small coffee from the person at the cash by using the expression ça va être. This is a somewhat laid-back way of ordering. You might prefer instead to use je vais prendre in this case. Bonjour, je vais prendre un petit café (s’il vous plaît).

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In 19-2, Ben and his blonde Catherine are in a fight. He’s recently discovered that she’s been taking la pilule behind his back — which explains why she’s not getting pregnant despite their efforts.

When Ben finally confronts Catherine about her deceitfulness, she storms off to the bedroom and locks the door. Ben bangs angrily on the door, telling her to open so that they can talk. He screams things like:

Parle-moé!
Talk to me!

and

Ouvre la porte pis parle-moé!
Open the door and talk to me!

and

Ouvre la crisse de porte!
Open the fucking door!

Later in the episode, we see that they’ve finally calmed down and are talking to each other. Ben wants to know why she doesn’t want a baby (and future) with him. He wonders aloud:

Qu’est-ce que j’ai fait de pas correct?
What did I do wrong?

Ben tries to accept the fact that a woman he’s spent two thirds of his life with doesn’t want to bear his child.

Realising they’ve reached the end of their relationship, Ben rhetorically asks what they’ll become now… roommates? fuck friends? des colocs? des fuck-friends?

A few notes: Ben pronounced qu’est-ce que j’ai fait de pas correct as qu’est-ce que j’ai faite de pas correc. Following the normal rules of French, the plural s is silent in both colocs and fuck-friends. In French, the stress in fuck-friend falls on the word friend.

[Language from 19-2, season 2, episode 3, Radio-Canada, Montréal, 11 February 2013.]

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Let’s look at some more informal French from episode 1 of Les Parent, season 5. (It’s still available on tou.tv as I write this.)

The Parent family are all seated at the table eating supper. Louis (the father) asks his youngest son Zak how his maths exam went.

Zak got a low mark on the exam, so he tries to avoid giving his father a direct answer about how he did. When Natalie (his mother) asks Zak what he got on the exam, only then does he admit how poorly he did.

Louis — Coudon Zak, t’étais pas supposé d’avoir le résultat de ton examen de maths aujourd’hui?
Zak — Quel examen?
Louis — Ben… ton examen de maths la semaine passée.
Zak — Ah ouais… c’t’examen-là!
Louis — Oui.
Zak — Ben, euh… c’était correct.
Louis — Correct…?
Zak — Correct comme dans correct, là.
Natalie — Zak, combien t’as eu?
Zak —
Quarante-cinq.
Louis — Combien??!

Here’s the conversation in English:

Louis — Hey Zak, weren’t you supposed to get your mark on your maths exam today?
Zak — What exam?
Louis — Well… your maths exam last week.
Zak — Oh right… that exam!
Louis — Yes.
Zak — Well, uhh… it was okay (an okay mark).
Louis — Okay…?
Zak — Yeah, okay as in okay.
Natalie — Zak, what (mark) did you get?
Zak — Forty-five (%).
Louis — What did you get (how much)??!

A closer look at some of the language from this dialogue:

Coudon is similar to “hey” or “so” in English, in that it can signal that a question is going to be asked. Sometimes it’s also spelled coudonc, but the final c isn’t pronounced.

The expression la semaine passée, or “last week,” contains the â sound in the word passée. (It sounds like pâssée.) Remember that â sounds a little like “aww.” Start listening for â so that you’ll hear just how it sounds.

Both Louis and Zak used the informal ben, which is similar to “well” in English and can serve as a filler word. It sounds like the French word bain.

Zak pronounced cet examen as c’t’examen, or like stexamen.

Both Louis and Zak pronounced correct informally as correc, without the final t.

In this conversation, tu étais was pronounced informally as t’étais, and tu as was pronounced as t’as.

The short form of mathématiques is maths or math. Although you’ll hear some people pronounce it as mats, the pronunciation mat is felt to be more correct regardless of how it’s spelled (with or without the s). Louis used the pronunciation mat.

Useful expression to learn: combien tu as eu? (informally: combien t’as eu?), or “what mark did you get?”

Dialogue from Les Parent, season 5, episode 1, Radio-Canada, Montreal, 17 September 2012.

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