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Posts Tagged ‘déjeuner’

We’ve seen before on OffQc that the three meals of the day in Québec are called:

  • le déjeuner, breakfast
  • le dîner, lunch
  • le souper, supper

On the radio, though, here’s what the host said to us listeners:

C’est l’heure du lunch qui s’en vient bientôt.
Lunchtime’s coming up.

That’s lunch’s second name in Québec: le lunch.

A reader of OffQc liked this Québecois usage: la boîte à lunch, which she found in this newspaper article online. The article is called Suggestions pour la boîte à lunch, and contains suggestions of lunches kids can take to school. You can say un sac à lunch if it’s a bag.

There’s another meal that could be added to this list: le brunch. It’s a meal that occurs between breakfast + lunch.

In advertising especially, you might notice the typically Québécois terms are sometimes not used. Here’s what’s on the back cover of an Ikea catalogue that showed up in my mailbox:

Petit-déjeuner au lit… comme ça, sans raison.
Breakfast in bed… just because.

Rather than calling breakfast in bed déjeuner au lit like they did in this TVA article, the Ikea magazine uses petit-déjeuner au lit.

Here’s how the TVA article used déjeuner au lit:

Vous cherchez à gâter maman à l’occasion de la fête des mères? Pourquoi ne pas lui préparer un décadent déjeuner au lit pour débuter sa journée en beauté?
Want to spoil Mother on Mother’s Day? Why not make her a decadent breakfast in bed so she can get her day off to a great start?

How do you say things like to have breakfast, to have supper, etc.? You can use the verb forms of the words (dîner, souper…). In #451, we saw:

Vous avez pas encore soupé.
You haven’t had supper yet.

Ça vous dérange pas qu’ils soupent avec nous?
Is it okay if they stay for supper? have supper with us?

You can also say things like aller souper, aller dîner, aller bruncher, etc. In #991, we saw:

aller souper au restaurant
to go out for supper

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In the last post, we looked at 10 words and expressions common to both Belgian and Québécois French.

This time, let’s do the same with Swiss French. A word or expression used in Swiss French is called a helvétisme.

I’ve referred to the Usito dictionary again. In it, there’s a list of helvétismes prepared by André Thibault. I’ve pulled 7 words from the list of helvétismes that also happen to be used in Québécois French.

Just like the shared Belgian-Québécois words and expressions, these shared Swiss-Québécois words may be heard in other French-speaking areas as well, not just in Switzerland and Québec.

mitaines

1. une mitaine
a mitten (the fingers aren’t separated in a mitten like they are in a glove)

2. une trâlée
a heap, slew, large amount (ex., une trâlée d’enfants)

3. un soûlon, une soûlonne
a drunk

4. trempe
soaking wet (ex. chemise trempe de sueur)

camisole

5. une camisole
a sleeveless undershirt, tank top

6. un bec
a kiss, peck (ex., un bec sur la joue)

7. une case postale, C.P.
a post-office box (ex., C.P. 2500, in an address)

Like Belgian and Québécois French, Swiss French also uses le déjeuner (breakfast), le dîner (lunch) and le souper (supper) as the names of the three meals of the day.

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The Québécois Usito dictionary contains a list of belgicismes (words and expressions used in Belgian French).

We’ve seen before how the names of the three meals of the day are the same in Québécois and Belgian French — le déjeuner (breakfast), le dîner (lunch) and le souper (supper).

I’ve picked 10 more items from the Usito list that can be heard in both Québécois and Belgian French according to the list’s author, Michel Francard.

The use of these words and expressions isn’t necessarily limited to Québécois and Belgian French. They may be heard in other French-speaking areas as well.

1. un banc de neige
a snowbank

2. jouer à la cachette
to play hide-and-seek

3. un camionneur, une camionneuse
a truck driver

4. une sacoche
a purse, handbag

5. à tantôt!
see you in a bit!

6. faire la file
to line up, queue up

7. avant-midi
morning (ex., dans l’avant-midi)

8. ennuyant
boring (ex., une conférence ennuyante)

9. d’abord
then, in that case (ex., vas-y d’abord, go ahead then)

10. goûter
to taste like (ex., ce vin goûte le vinaigre)

In the next post — shared Québécois and Swiss French words.

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Remember the Mansfield gym with their Fuck the excuses posters? Or how about the Be better than your best excuse ones? They’ve got some new posters outside the gym now, these ones suggesting reasons to work out:

Je le fais pour le gâteau double chocolat après le souper!
I do it for the double chocolate cake after supper!

Je le fais pour rester jeune et continuer à jouer avec mes enfants!
I do it to stay young and keep playing with my kids!

Je le fais pour pouvoir encore le faire quand j’aurai 85 ans!
I do it so I’ll still be able to do it when I’m 85 years old!

In the first sign, we’ve got the word souper. Do you remember what the three meals of the day are called in Québec?

le déjeuner, breakfast
le dîner, lunch
le souper, supper

For some (but not all) francophones elsewhere in the world, the three meals are called le petit déjeuner, le déjeuner, le dîner instead. This is the case for Parisians. The Québécois usages aren’t limited to Québec. They’re also used in Belgium and Switzerland.

The Québécois usage of déjeuner for breakfast instead of lunch makes sense. Le jeûne is a period of fasting (not eating). On jeûne through the night, and on déjeune in the morning at the déjeuner. The déjeuner breaks the jeûne.

English and Spanish also use the equivalent of déjeuner: “breakfast” breaks the fast, and desayuno breaks the ayuno.

In addition to le dîner, lunch is also called le lunch in Québec. Une boîte à lunch is a lunchbox. Sur mon heure de lunch means “on my lunch break,” like at work.

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