Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘dépanneur’

In entry #952, we saw a wall ad from the Yellow Pages in métro McGill (image on right). The ad is promoting a phone app that helps people to find businesses in the area.

In the ad, the French word pointe is used in reference to both rush hour and slices of pizza. You can go back and read the post about here, if you missed it.

In fact, métro McGill is currently plastered from one end of the platform to the other with yellow ads from the Yellow Pages.

Here’s another one that contains some Québécois usages.

A little sign on the wall reads:

Vous vous sentez gratteux?

We saw the word gratteux recently, in entry #943. There, we looked at how the adjective gratteux can be used in the sense of cheap or stingy, whereas the masculine noun gratteux refers to a scratch-and-win lottery ticket.

On either side of this little sign is a larger sign.

(The little sign that reads vous vous sentez gratteux? is in the middle of the two signs above, but you can’t see it in this image because it’s dark.)

The sign to the left of the little one reads:

2 friperies pour vous habiller à petit prix

And the one to the right reads:

88 dépanneurs pour acheter un billet de loterie

So the question vous vous sentez gratteux? takes on two different meanings here.

Vous vous sentez gratteux?
2 friperies pour vous habiller à petit prix
Feeling stingy?
2 second-hand clothes shops to buy cheap clothes

Vous vous sentez gratteux?
88 dépanneurs pour acheter un billet de loterie
Feeling ‘scratch-and-win’?
88 dépanneurs to buy a lottery ticket

That’s a lot of vocab in these past two posts, so here’s a review of it:

l’heure de pointe, rush hour
c’est l’heure de pointe, it’s rush hour
une pointe de pizza, a slice of pizza
une pointe aux champignons, a mushroom slice (of pizza)
gratteux, cheap, stingy
un gratteux, a scratch-and-win lottery ticket
gratter, to scratch
un dépanneur, a small shop selling snacks, milk, newspapers, cigarettes…
une friperie, a second-hand clothing shop

Yes, no, toaster!

There’s yet another sign from the Yellow Pages in métro McGill that reads:

«Yes, no, toaster!»
Votre anglais est limité? Il y a 61 écoles de langue à Montréal.
“Yes, no, toaster!”
Don’t speak much English? There are 61 language schools in Montréal.

What’s up with the yes, no, toaster bit in this ad?

Yes, no, toaster is an expression – it’s not something the Yellow Pages made up. It’s a facetious way of pointing to a person’s minimal knowledge of English (i.e., the only English that person knows is yes, no and toaster).

Read Full Post »

In Québec, you’ll hear ici also said as icitte. It’s considered to be a very informal way of saying ici.

The other day, I walked past a dépanneur serving the Haitian community in Montréal.

A small sign in the front window caught my attention. The sign is from a mobile phone company; it’s about recharging the minutes on a mobile.

The sign says: METE MINIT ISIT LA

I don’t speak Haitian Creole, but here’s my guess:

METTEZ DES MINUTES ICITTE, LÀ!

Hmm, too québécois with the là, maybe.

More seriously, I’m not entirely sure what la means on the sign. I’m going to hasard a guess and say that isit la means ici même. If anybody knows, leave a comment. (I should’ve gone in and asked…)

As for isit, it seems fairly clear it means icitte, I think!

Read Full Post »

Julie LaferrièreIf you live in Montréal and read the Métro while riding the métro, perhaps you’ve come across Julie Laferrière’s column Hors du commun on Tuesdays.

In her column, Laferrière shares her experiences while using public transportation in Montréal.

In her article La noblesse (9 Dec. 2013), Laferrière describes an experience with a homeless man at métro Saint-Laurent: The homeless man asks her for change, but she doesn’t have any. Instead, she offers him the nuts she’s just bought at the dépanneur. The only problem is that he’s got no teeth and can’t eat them. The experience moves her.

In her article, there are several québécois usages that we can look at. On her way to the métro, Laferrière describes how hungry she was:

(…) je n’ai rien avalé depuis la toast de 7 h ce matin.
I haven’t eaten anything since the toast (that I ate) at 7 this morning.

She decides to go the dépanneur to buy a snack:

J’opte alors pour le dépanneur du métro Saint-Laurent et je jette mon dévolu sur un gros sac de noix.
So I decide to go the dépanneur at métro Saint-Laurent, and I set my sights on a big bag of nuts.

After she buys the nuts, a homeless man calls out to her and asks for twenty-five cents:

Madame, t’as-tu vingt-cinq cennes S.V.P.?
Madame, d’ya have twenty-five cents, please?

Laferrière doesn’t have change, so she offers him the nuts she’s just bought. With a large toothless smile, the man tells her:

T’es ben fine, mais j’pourrai pas faire grand-chose avec ça.
You’re really kind, but there’s not much I can do with that [with the nuts].

To read the entire article, click here or on the image above.

une toast
a piece of toast
Toast is a feminine word in French.

un dépanneur
a shop where you can buy snacks, cigarettes, milk, etc.

t’as-tu…?
ya got…?
d’ya have…?
Read more about this informal usage here.

une cenne
one cent

vingt-cinq cennes
twenty-five cents

ben [sounds like bain]
really

t’es ben fine [said to a woman]
you’re really nice, kind

t’es ben fin [said to a man]
you’re really nice, kind

There are some other expressions in the article that you might like to learn:

il flatte son chien
he’s patting his dog

j’ai une boule dans la gorge
I’ve got a knot in my throat [because of emotion]

Read Full Post »

Dépanneur Nour

In Québec, le dépanneur is where you buy the stuff that feeds your vice of choice: cigarettes, alcohol, Skittles…

And, in Arabic, “nour” means lumière.

The dépanneur above, serving an Arab community around métro Saint-Michel in Montréal, calls itself dépanneur Nour.

The owner of this dépanneur is obviously offcois:

Above the door, we discover the word dépannour — a playful blend of Québécois and Arabic (a.k.a. arabébécois).

Dépannour

Read Full Post »

In this blog post on Urbania, where the author discusses her dislike for bungee jumping, you can learn some good new expressions in French.

sauter en bungee
to bungee jump

lâcher sa job sans plan B
to quit one’s job without a plan B

voler de la gomme au dépanneur
to steal gum at the dépanneur

faire un remake
to do a remake

copuler en cachette dans un endroit public
to copulate secretly in a public place

une expérience qui pourrait mal virer
an experience that could go wrong

Read Full Post »