Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘esti’

Montréal

Here are 3 examples of French using swear words heard in Québec. They’re taken from Facebook comments.

Maudit que t’es beau!
Damn you’re good-looking!
Damn you look good!

C’est pas d’sa faute si c’est un esti d’cave.
It’s not his fault if he’s a fucking idiot.

Maudite marde.
Holy shit. Damn it.

Do you remember how to pronounce maudit like the Québécois? The letter d sounds like dz when it’s followed by the French i sound. (It’s like the dz sound in the English word lads.) So maudit sounds like [modzi], and maudite sounds like [modzit].

In English, you say a fucking idiot, but in French it’s un esti de cave, with de placed between esti (fucking) and cave (idiot). You can’t say un esti cave. In our example above, the de is contracted informally to d’.

C’est un esti d’cave from the example can contract even further: c’t’un esti d’cave, where c’est is reduced to just a st sound before un.

C’est pas d’ma faute means it’s not my fault.

Read Full Post »

ma-vie-cest-de-la-marde-francais-quebecois

Ma vie, c’est d’la marde.

Ma vie, c’est d’la marde.
My life is shitty.
[His life is shitty because he got D+ at school. Well, at least he got the +.]

Stresse pas, bro!
La vie est si belle!
Don’t stress out, bro!
Life is so nice!

C’est vrai, au moins il fait beau en esti!
That’s true, at least it’s fuckin’ nice out!

Hehe, j’niaisais!
Hehe, I was kidding!

_ _ _

[…] en esti, fucking […]
c’est beau en esti!, that’s fucking nice!
t’es hot en esti!, you’re fucking hot!

niaiser, to kid, to joke
arrête de niaiser!, stop kidding around!
me niaises-tu?, are you kidding me?

+ 13 example sentences of the québécois marde here.

Bon lundi!

Read Full Post »

1. de quoi tu parles?

Confused, a guy asked his friend de quoi tu parles?, or “what are you talking about?” Using the inversion here (de quoi parles-tu?) would sound much less conversational.

2. viens-t’en!

A mother told her child to come to her by saying viens-t’en, “come here.” The opposite (go away) is va-t’en. The infinitive forms are s’en venir (to come along) and s’en aller (to go away). Je m’en viens means “I’m coming.”

3. un esti de gros cave

A guy told his friend that the person they were talking about was un esti de gros cave, or “a big fucking idiot.” Esti is a swear word in Québec. Cave (idiot) isn’t a swear word, but it is an insult.

4. chu allé

During a conversation, my neighbour’s child pronounced je suis allé informally as chu allé. Another informal pronunciation you may hear is chui allé. My young neighbour also got into an argument with an another neighbour. He told her she was crazy: t’es folle!

5. y’a rien de bon icitte

An angry lady in a restaurant said y’a rien de bon icitte, “there’s nothin’ good here.” Some native speakers may find it odd to hear a learner of French say icitte instead of ici. Saying y’a rien de bon ici is perfectly conversational too.

Il y a is generally pronounced as y’a during conversations. In this example, y’a rien is an informal pronunciation of il n’y a rien.

Read Full Post »

Unless you’ve got the eyes of a fucking hawk, click to see a larger version.

These 5 ads, seen near the entrance to a gym in Montréal, take a bold approach at encouraging us to tighten up our unsightly arses.

The ads use language like tabarnak, ostie, je m’en câlisse and fuck.

To shield sensitive eyes from vulgarity in French, the offensive bits have been smeared with a layer of blood-stained blubber syphoned out of a desperate gym member.

Je m’en câlisse des excuses!
Fuck off with the excuses already!
(I don’t give a fuck about the excuses!)

Ostie que ça fait du bien!
Fuck that feels good!

Bouge ton gros cul!
Move your fat ass!

Fuck le temps supplémentaire, je m’entraîne!
Fuck the overtime, I’m gonna work out!

Tabarnak que je suis hot!
Fuck I’m hot!

(Ads from Club Athlétique Mansfield)

Read Full Post »

OffQc

Yes! Entry #600!

As #600 approached, I got curious as to the most googled québécois words and phrases that led people to OffQc since it began in December 2010… and there they are in the image above!

You can click on it to make it bigger.

Do you know them all?

Thanks everybody for continuing to read OffQc. It’s a privilege to have your attention.

Read Full Post »

If you have access to Radio-Canada on television or all the videos on tou.tv, give the police series 19-2 a try.

You’ll find the dialogue in 19-2 challenging, but you really shouldn’t miss the show if you have the chance to view it. Season 2 is now underway.

In the first episode of season 2, viewers are confronted with difficult scenes to watch. The episode takes place in a secondary school where an adolescent has opened fire.

Not surprisingly, we hear the police officers in this series talk about guns. In different scenes, we hear them refer informally to a gun as un gun.

In one scene, a police officer yells at a suspect:
Drop ton gun! (Drop your gun!)

Then, more aggressively, he yells again:
Drop ton esti d’gun! (Drop your fuckin’ gun!)

Later, an officer yells at a suspect pinned to the ground:
Yé où ton gun? (Where’s your gun?, yé = il est)

Then, more aggressively:
Yé où ton esti d’gun? (Where’s your fuckin’ gun?)

We can look at some more language from 19-2 in future entries. If you’re looking for a series to watch containing a lot of street French, 19-2 won’t disappoint.

[Quotes from 19-2, season 2, episode 1, Radio-Canada, Montréal, 28 January 2013.]

Read Full Post »