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Posts Tagged ‘folk trash’

On her Facebook page, singer Lisa LeBlanc recently posted the update in the first image related to the show on the plaines d’Abraham in Québec. You can click on all the images in this post to see a larger version.

Remember, Lisa LeBlanc was born in New Brunswick, in a place called Rosaireville. She was born in 1990.

The French in this entry is how Lisa LeBlanc uses it as a francophone from New Brunswick, not Québec. More specifically, this variety of language is called Chiac.

In her update, she comments on the size of the stage:

Si jamais tu veux faire ton jogging, t’as juste à courir d’un boute à l’autre du stage des plaines une couple de fois pi tu seras all good. #cecittecesthuge

If you ever wanna go jogging, you just have to run a couple times from one end of the stage to the other on the Plains and you’re all good. #itshuge

Learn the expression si jamais. This is used all time. It means “if ever.” Si jamais tu veux parler, je suis là. Si jamais t’as besoin d’aide, appelle-moi.

Lisa didn’t write bout, she wrote boute. This pronunciation of bout is something you’ll hear often in colloquial French. Courir d’un boute à l’autre du stage.

She called the stage le stage, which is pronounced like its English equivalent. Note that if you pronounce stage as a French word, it refers to on-the-job training offered by educational institutions.

Une couple de fois? A couple times! This expression isn’t borrowed from English, despite appearances. It’s the other way round: English got the expression from French. You’ll hear couple pronounced colloquially as coupe.

What about the hashtag? If we pull it apart, we get cecitte, c’est huge. Cecitte means “this,” like ceci. (Compare to ici and icitte.)

Lisa uses two more borrowings from English: c’est huge and tu seras all good. Both huge and all good are pronounced like their English equivalents.

I wanted to take another look at Lisa’s use of cecitte, so I did a search on Google for examples.

In the results, I came across more examples of cecitte from none other than Lisa LeBlanc herself!

In the second image, Lisa writes:

Well, cecitte, ça vient de blower ma mind.

Well, this just blew my mind.

You gotta love Lisa’s French!

Apart from another example of cecitte, we’ve also got blower ma mind.

La mind is pronounced like its English equivalent, and so is blower but then transformed into an -er verb (sounds like blow + é).

Hold on, we’re not done…

Here’s one more example from Lisa where she uses cecitte again, this time in a tweet:

Trouver cecitte. Être vraiment contente. YES.

Finding this. Being really happy. YES.

Lisa has written this tweet in a style typical of the updates on Facebook and Twitter.

It’s not unusual to hear francophones say YES! when happy about something.

Apprendre le français de Rosaireville sur OffQc. YES!

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I like Lisa LeBlanc’s profile description on Twitter (@lisaleblancyo):

J’fais du Folk-Trash, j’viens d’un village de 40 personnes pi j’u tannée de chanter des chansons fi-filles.

I do trash folk, I come from a village of 40 people an’ I’m sick of singing girly-girl songs.

Le folk-trash is what Lisa LeBlanc calls her musical genre. Her music is folk, but the lyrics are bolder and… trashier.

For example, her song called Câlisse-moi là means “Fucking dump me,” and the one called Ma vie, c’est de la marde means “My life is shitty.”

We’ve seen hundreds of times on OffQc that pis is very frequently used as a synonym of et. Pis is a contraction of puis. It’s pronounced pi, and that’s exactly how Lisa LeBlanc has chosen to spell it here.

Unlike et though, pis is an informal usage only. We can say pis is just as informal sounding (and just as normal sounding) as English’s “and” contracted to “an’.”

What’s that j’u in there? It means je suis. We’ve also seen many, many times on OffQc how je suis can contract informally to j’suis, which sounds like chu or chui. Lisa LeBlanc has chosen to spell it as j’u here, but it sounds like chu.

Do you wonder where the ch sound in chu comes from? When je suis contracts to j’suis, the j’s is pronounced ch.

The informally contracted j’s always sounds like ch, which is also why je sais contracted to j’sais sounds like ché.

Every self-respecting learner of Québécois French must master the expression être tanné de! It means “to be fed up with,” “to be tired of,” “to be sick of,” “to have had enough of.”

The expression être tanné de can be followed by a noun or a verb: Chu tannée de chanter des chansons fi-filles. Chu tannée des chansons fi-filles.

Remember that tannée is the feminine form; the masculine form is tanné.

One last word to look at from the description: fi-fille. If Lisa LeBlanc’s music is trash folk or du folk-trash, then it’s definitely not gonna sound all prissy with sappy love songs and shit. I mean, just fuckin’ câlisse-moi là, right?

The fi part of fi-fille is a shortening of fille. If we wanted to translate fi-fille very literally, we’d get gi-girl or gi-girly. Nobody says that in English though, so fi-fille means “prissy,” “girly-girl” or just “girly.”

If you had trouble understanding Lisa LeBlanc’s profile description at the beginning of this post, read it again now:

J’fais du Folk-Trash, j’viens d’un village de 40 personnes pi j’u tannée de chanter des chansons fi-filles.

Now go read or reread all the posts on OffQc related to Lisa LeBlanc or discover her trashy, anti-fi-fille music on her website!

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