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Posts Tagged ‘gai’

It’s been a while since we’ve looked at some French language from the TV show Les Parent. Let’s look at a scene from season 5, where we come across the québécois usages épeurant, moumoune and ben correct.

The scene:

Louis Parent has received his cousin Kevin Parent as a guest at his place. (Kevin is played by real-life singer Kevin Parent.)

During Kevin’s stay, a character called Marie takes a liking to him. Marie is a friend of the Parent family. She wants to watch a scary movie with Kevin late at night hoping to put the moves on him.

When Marie is alone in the living room with Kevin, she begins to flirt, using the subject of the scary movie that she’s about to see as her excuse:

Est-ce que c’est très épeurant comme film? Parce que moi j’suis vraiment moumoune.
Is it a really scary movie? Because I’m a real scaredy-cat.

Kevin doesn’t seem to be into Marie. He responds:

Non, c’est un peu dur, mais c’est pas vraiment épeurant. Tu vas être ben correcte.
No, it’s a bit rough but it’s not really scary. You’re gonna be just fine.

épeurant, scary
moumoune*, scaredy-cat, wimp, sissy
ben correct, just fine

*A note about une moumoune:

In the quote above, Marie used moumoune as an adjective to refer to herself as someone who gets scared easily. This word can become offensive if a gay male is referred to as une moumoune.

[Language taken from Les Parent, “Kevin qui vient dîner,” season 5, episode 1, Radio-Canada, Montréal, 17 September 2012.]

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Here’s some more informal French from Urbania — not from the magazine itself, but from their Facebook page!

In this Facebook update, an Urbania writer tells us:

On a envoyé un de nos journalistes dans un sauna gai. Oui, il a vu des bizounes. Mais s’est-il fait pogner la sienne? À lire!

La bizoune, that’s the thing that boys have between their legs. So the journalist that they sent to a gay sauna, he saw lots of them.

La Parlure here and Wikébec there each have an example of la bizoune for you.

To go straight to the article on the Urbania website written by Frédéric Guindon, you can read it here. Only part of it is online. The rest is in the magazine in itself. There’s some funny language in the article, like the way the author describes the bizounes that he saw as des cobras sur le point d’attaquer.

[Quote from Urbania Facebook status update, 6 February 2012.]

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The winter 2012 issue of the thematic (and always fascinating) magazine Urbania is now available en kiosque. This issue, #32, is devoted to the theme of lesbiennes.

You may remember this magazine from entry #385, where the autumn issue was devoted to the theme of babies.

Over the next while, we can look at some of the vocabulary in this issue related to lesbians and homosexuality.

For this entry, let’s look at some of the language that was used in French to talk about “coming out,” or revealing one’s homosexuality.

Even though the expressions below come from an issue devoted to the theme of lesbians, they can all be used when talking about gay males too.

To say “to come out,” the expression used most often in this issue is:

  • faire son coming out

Elle a fait son coming out en 2001.
J’ai fait mon coming out à ma famille.

Another expression used in numerous articles is:

  • sortir du placard

This is the equivalent of “to come out of the closet.”

La sœur de Marge Simpson est sortie du placard en 2005.*
Il est sorti du placard.

Other expressions that appear in the issue include:

  • avouer son homosexualité
  • annoncer son homosexualité
  • révéler son homosexualité
  • afficher son homosexualité
  • sortir de la garde-robe (also sortir du garde-robe in Quebec)
  • faire sa sortie du placard

If you’re looking for interesting reading material in French with contemporary and urban vocabulary, give Urbania a try.

But be warned: Because each issue is thematic, with interesting articles and images printed on paper that feels good to touch, you may be tempted to start collecting them!

——

*Marjolaine Arcand, « 25 lesbiennes qu’on aime ». Urbania, hiver 2012, numéro 32, Montréal, page 33.

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