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Posts Tagged ‘gosser’

In the last post, we saw an example of the Québécois verb gosser.

Let’s take a closer look at how the verb gosser can be used in the sense of “to bug someone” or “to give someone a rough time.”

Here are some good examples pulled from a quick Google search:

Au secondaire tu n’arrêtais pas de me gosser avec ça! In secondary school, you always bugged me about that!

Mon propriétaire est un vieux pervers dégueu qui arrête pas de me gosser. The owner is a disgusting, old pervert who keeps bugging me.

Ma blonde arrêtait pas de me gosser pour en acheter une. My girlfriend kept bugging me to buy one.

In the last entry, Rabii Rammal used se faire gosser instead. If gosser quelqu’un means “to give someone a rough time,” then se faire gosser means “to be given a rough time” by someone. Rammal wrote:

Tous, homme ou femme, ont le droit de ne pas se faire gosser dans la rueEverybody, male or female, has the right to not be bothered in the street.

Here are a few more examples pulled from a Google search:

Je me faisais gosser par les infirmières à l’hôpital pour que mes garçons boivent aux 3 heures. I was bugged by the nurses at the hospital to get my boys to drink every 3 hours.

Je me suis fait gosser par un policier. I was given a rough time by a policeman.

J’haïs tellement ça me faire gosser par un vendeur! I hate it so much when salesmen bug me!

Tips: Aux trois (quatre, cinq…) heures means “every three (four, five…) hours.” J’haïs is pronounced ja-i.

In short:

gosser quelqu’un
to give someone a rough time

se faire gosser par quelqu’un
to be given a rough time by someone

The verb gosser has even more uses than just the ones here. Let’s leave that for a future post…

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In La Presse, Rabii Rammal writes an article in response to a video called “10 hours of walking in NYC as a woman.” This video shows a woman who receives unwanted attention 100 times in 10 hours walking through New York.

Rammal’s article (C’est rassurant, être un homme) contains a few Québécois usages.

Referring to the men who called out to the woman asking how she was doing, he writes:

Qu’est-ce que t’en as à colisser de comment elle va? What the hell do you care how she’s doing?

He also writes:

Tous, homme ou femme, ont le droit de ne pas se faire gosser dans la rue. Everybody, male or female, has the right to not be bothered in the street.

In the first quote, qu’est-ce que t’en as à colisser? (“what the hell do you care?” or even “what the fuck do you care?”) is an impolite usage.

Gosser quelqu’un means “bother, exasperate, nag someone,” example: y’arrête pas de me gosser avec ça, “he won’t stop bothering me about that; he won’t stop nagging me about that.” Rammal’s quote uses se faire gosser.

[French quotes written by Rabii Rammal in C’est rassurant, être un homme, La Presse, 2 November 2014.]

* * *

When you order food at a fast food restaurant, you’ll need to know these expressions: C’est pour ici? (Is it for here?) C’est pour manger ici? (Is it for [eating] here?) C’est pour emporter? (Is it to go?) C’est pour ici ou pour emporter? (Is it for here or to go?)

At a fast food restaurant in Montréal this weekend, the cashier left me wondering what my third possibility was for where to eat my food.

– C’est pour emporter?
– Non.
– C’est pour manger ici?

– Is it to go?
– No.
– Is it for here?

😐

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A good expression to learn is arrête donc de. With this expression, you can tell people to stop doing whatever it is that’s bothering you.

Google is our friend again. I typed arrête donc de to find 10 things that people want others to stop doing.

Donc is pronounced don here. I’ll use the spelling don’ to help you remember.

I’ve translated arrête don’ de in the examples as “stop (doing whatever)” and “stop (doing whatever), will you.”

Arrête don’ de chiâler contre les chiâleux.
Stop complaining about people who complain.

T’aimes pas ça te faire gosser?
Ben arrête don’ de gosser les autres.
You don’t like to be bugged?
Well stop bugging others then.

Arrête don’ de faire ta moumoune.
Stop acting like a sissy, will you.

Arrête don’ de capoter pour rien.
Stop freaking out for nothing.

Arrête don’ de dire des niaiseries.
Stop saying such stupid things, will you.
Stop talking nonsense, will you.

Arrête don’ de blâmer les joueurs.
Stop blaming the players.

Arrête don’ de péter d’la broue.
Stop showing off. (Péter sounds like pèté.)

Don’t forget the form arrêtez donc de, of course. This one can be used when speaking to more than one person.

Arrêtez don’ de bitcher sur les posts des autres!
Stop bitching on other people’s posts!

Arrêtez don’ de niaiser, c’est sérieux tout ça.
Stop messing around, this is serious stuff.

Arrêtez don’ de chercher des bibittes partout!
Stop finding fault with everything!
Stop looking for problems everywhere!

I’ll end with this note about the word une bibitte: it means “bug” (insect). So the last example literally means “stop looking for bugs everywhere.” This word is also said as une bébitte. We’ll look more closely at how this word is used in another entry.

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