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Posts Tagged ‘Guy A. Lepage’

On Twitter, Guy A. Lepage commented on a case in which a mother was found guilty of offering her daughter to her spouse as a sex toy, un jouet sexuel.

Lepage called the woman a colice de conne on Twitter.

What does this mean?

Here’s what the tweet says:

Colice de conne ! Prison longtemps please Une mère offre sa fille comme jouet sexuel à son conjoint via

If you guessed that Guy A. Lepage is insulting the mother, you’d be right! Here’s how it might read if it had been written in English:

Fucking idiot! Long prison sentence, please. A mother offers her daughter as a sex toy to her spouse.

Calling a man un con or a woman une conne is an insult in French.

The masculine word con in French is vulgar. Its English equivalent is cunt. In fact, con (French), cunt (English) and coño (Spanish) are all etymologically related.

When con or conne is used to insult someone, it becomes an offensive way of calling someone an idiot.

Interestingly, we read this about the usage of con and conne in Québec on Wikipedia:

Con et conne existent aussi au Québec et sont fréquemment utilisés, mais n’ont été adoptés que dans la deuxième moitié du 20esiècle, sous l’influence des films français. Ce terme argotique nous était inconnu avant la deuxième guerre mondiale.

Con and conne also exist in Québec and are frequently used, but they weren’t adopted until the second half of the 20th century, influenced by French films. This slang term was not used in Québec before the Second World War.

On that Wikipedia page, con and conne were given as synonyms of épais and épaisse, which are frequently used in Québec in the sense of “idiot.”

What about colice?

We’ve seen this before on OffQc but more often spelled on the blog as câlice and câlisse. In colice de conne, the colice de part means “fucking.”

colice de conne, fucking idiot
colice de cave, fucking idiot
colice de marde, fucking shit
ma câlisse de job, my fucking job
une câlice de bonne idée, a fucking good idea
un câlisse de chien sale, a fucking dirty dog

Be sure to listen to Laurent Paquin’s Chant sacré, where you’ll hear all kinds of Québécois swear words in a very short song.

You can follow Guy A. Lepage on Twitter here.

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I came across a little sign in a sports equipment store. It says:

Faites votre frais avec ce gilet.

There’s word play going on here… To understand it, you first need to know the expression faire son frais as used in Québec.

One of the advantages of this gilet is that it’s been designed to keep you cool, or frais, when you wear it.

That’s why the author of this sign chose the expression faire son frais to promote it — it allows for wordplay on frais, “cool.”

What does faire son frais mean?

Faire son frais means “to show off” in Québec.

There are two forms to this expression: a masculine form (faire son frais) and a feminine form (faire sa fraîche).

What this sign is telling us is that we can show off by wearing this gilet, with the added meaning conveyed by the word frais that it will keep you cool.

Faites votre frais avec ce gilet.
Show off with this shirt.
(and keep cool)

More examples of faire son frais…

As usual, I went digging around on the web looking for good examples of the expression faire son frais, faire sa fraîche. Here’s what I found. Remember, you can click on all the images to see a larger size.

A Facebook update reads:

Ce chien fait son frais dans une Porsche!

This dog is showing off in a Porsche!

In the image, we see a dog poking its body out the window, showing off as he rides in a Porsche.

On a site called Gros Blogue, I found an article about the best selfie of the year. They displayed images of different selfies taken by celebrities.

For one of the selfies in particular, the caption used the expression faire son frais:

Joseph Gordon-Levitt qui fait son frais dans sa limousine.

Joseph Gordon-Levitt who’s showing off in his limousine.

The smug look on his face says it all… faire son frais!

And the feminine form faire sa fraîche

But what about the feminine form faire sa fraîche? All the examples that follow refer to females (or feminine nouns).

A blog author expresses dislike for the show Tout le monde en parle and has this to say about it:

J’écoute que très rarement l’émission Tout le monde en parle, je suis vraiment pas capable de Guy A. Lepage, Dany Turcotte et de l’espèce de pétasse prétentieuse qui fait sa fraîche avec son vin.

I only watch the show Tout le monde en parle very rarely. I really can’t stand Guy A. Lepage, Dany Turcotte and the pretentious bitch who shows off with her wine.

Side note 1: Do you remember the informal expression pas capab’? If someone says chu pas capab’ de Guy A. Lepage, it means “I can’t stand Guy A. Lepage.” In entry #812, we saw examples of this expression, like: Moi là, l’hiver, pas capab’, which means that the person can’t stand winter.

Side note 2: The verb écouter is used very frequently in Québec to talk about watching a television show. Regarder is also used in Québec, but know that you’ll probably hear écouter used more often: écouter une émission, to watch a show.

In another example, a blog commenter writes a sentence that mentions a sister-in-law showing off with a new coat from France:

La belle-sœur faisait sa fraîche avec son manteau commandé en France (…).

The sister-in-law was showing off with her coat ordered from France.

And in this last example, the author of an article about cars comments on the lack of style of a particular model of Hyundai:

Donc, aussi digne de notre attention fût-elle, cette petite machine n’a jamais fait sa fraîche au chapitre du style.

So, as much as (this car) was worthy of our attention, it’s never stood out (lit., showed off) as far as style goes.

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