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Posts Tagged ‘Les Parent’

Here’s a new texto conversation in French taken from the Les Parent Facebook page.

We saw another one recently in entry #874.

Today’s conversation uses the word niaiseux. The conversation takes place between husband (blue) and wife (grey).

Click on the image to make it bigger.

Chéri, c’est quoi, le nouveau NIP de la carte?
Honey, what’s the [bank] card’s new PIN?

Tu devrais pas demander ça par texto.
You shouldn’t ask that in a text message.

Je sais, mais je suis pressée.
I know, but I’m in a rush.

(Ton âge) x 3 – 125, date du décès de ton oncle Guy, mon chiffre chanceux, nombre de pattes de mon premier chien.
(Your age) x 3 – 125, the day your uncle Guy died, my lucky number, the number of paws my first dog had.

1-2-3-4?
1-2-3-4?

Affirmatif…
Affirmative…

Niaiseux.
You goof.

NIP stands for numéro d’identification personnel. It’s pronounced like a word, not as three individual letters. Your NIP is the code you enter at the bank machine or when paying by debit.

Un texto is a text message. Par texto means “by text message.” This is similar to un courriel (an email) and par courriel (by email).

The wife calls the husband niaiseux here. She’s teasing him when she says this. It’s like calling him a goof for delivering the PIN to her through coded language. The feminine form is niaiseuse.

The adjective niaiseux can also mean “idiot” or “stupid” and be used to insult someone. It’s obvious here that it’s being used to tease though, not insult.

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Here’s a fictitious text message conversation between two brothers (Zak and Oli) taken from the Québécois television comedy Les Parent.

You can click on the phone to enlarge it.

Oli, es-tu réveillé?
Oli, are you awake?

Ouais… Pas capable de dormir.
Yeah… Can’t sleep.

Lol! Moi non plus. J’entends ronfler jusque dans ma chambre.
Lol! Neither can I. I can hear the snoring all the way in my room.

Je sais. Imagine quand tu dors dans le même lit.
I know. Imagine what it’s like when you sleep in the same bed.

Yark! Grand-p’pa devrait clairement se faire opérer les fosses nasales! Lol!
Yuck! Granddad obviously needs to get his nostrils operated! Lol!

Heu… C’est ma blonde qui ronfle.
Uh… It’s my girlfriend who’s snoring.

Notes

Réveillé means “awoken” (awoken from sleep). Debout means “up” (physically out of bed).

Learn the difference between moi aussi and moi non plus. Moi aussi means “me too.” Moi non plus means “me neither.”

— J’aime ça. I like that.
— Moi aussi. So do I.

— J’aime pas ça. I don’t like that.
— Moi non plus. Neither do I.

Capable often sounds like capab’ when it’s pronounced informally. Chu pas capab’ de dormir. I can’t sleep.

Une blonde is used in Québec for “girlfriend.”

This show is called Les Parent and not Les Parents. Parent is the family’s surname. The title translated into English is “The Parent Family.”

In French, you never put an s on a surname in the plural, no matter what the ethnic background: les Tremblay, les Rossi, les Jackson.

Because this comedy deals with the trials of being a parent, the title is in fact also a play on words (les Parent sounds like les parents).

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OK, fine, so Italy got eliminated at the World Cup.

I’m feeling better today (thank you), but they need to get back to work now and so do I.

Here’s today entry: talking about plans for the summer holidays.

This Les Parent Facebook update from 23 June asks:

Finissez-vous l’école cette semaine?
Que ferez-vous de vos vacances?

Do you finish school this week?
What will you do on your holidays?

The second question more literally means “what will you make of your holidays?” The comments section was full of answers from young people, so let’s see what some of them had to say.

Lots of travelling plans:

aller en Gaspésie
go to Gaspésie

aller à New York
go to New York

Je m’en vais au Portugal.
I’m going to Portugal.

M’en vas à Trois-Pistoles… yes!
Going to Trois-Pistoles… yes!
(M’en vas sounds more informal than je m’en vais.)

Rien à part brûler au soleil aux quatre coins du Québec.
Nothing other than burn in the sun all over Québec.

visiter les régions du Québec
visit the regions of Québec
(i.e., travel around Québec)

Others plan to spend time outdoors:

la Ronde, la Ronde
la Ronde, la Ronde
(It’s an amusement park in Montréal.)

Je vais sûrement aller à la Ronde ou à la plage.
I’ll most likely go to the Ronde or the beach.

pêche et vélo
fishing and biking

me baigner
go swimming

me baigner et me chicaner avec ma soeur
go swimming and fight with my sister

No holidays for some kids:

travailler, travailler, travailler et encore travailler
work, work, work and more work

Travailler au camp d’été!
Work at summer camp!

Some plan to relax or just be lazy:

D.O.R.M.I.R. tout court
S.L.E.E.P., end of story

chiller
chill out

rien
nothing

aucune idée
no idea

Pour l’instant, je préfère être au lit.
For the moment, I prefer to be in bed.

Je vais rester à la maison et relaxer tout l’été.
I’m going to stay home and relax all summer.

fuck all
fuck all

Et vous, que ferez-vous de vos vacances ?
Ne dites pas « fuck all » !

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This text message exchange comes from the Les Parent Facebook page.

Les Parent is a comedy from Québec. The name of the show really is Les Parent and not Les Parents, because Parent is a surname, and a common too — like the singer Kevin Parent. The name of the show means “The Parent Family” and not “The Parents.”

This exchange of textos takes place between Thomas and his mother. The green textos are from the mother, the grey ones from Thomas.

Bonne journée, mon Thomas.
Have a good day, [my] Thomas.

Bonne journée?
Have a good day?

C’est ça, réponds-moi pas.
That’s right, don’t answer me.

On sait ben. C’est juste ta mère qui te texte. Mais si c’est ta blonde ou tes amis, tu réponds dans la SECONDE.
We all know. It’s just your mother texting you. But if it’s your girlfriend or your friends, you answer within a SECOND.

Pas quand je conduis.
Not when I’m driving.

Tu conduis?
You’re driving?

OUI!
YES!

LÂCHE TON CELL TOUT DE SUITE, TU M’ENTENDS!
DROP YOUR CELL IMMEDIATELY, YOU HEAR ME!

_ _ _

Remember, in Québec the â in lâcher sounds like “aww.” Lawwwche ton cell!

A smartphone is called un téléphone intelligent. Un texto is a text message, and texter (quelqu’un) means “to text (someone).”

on sait ben = on sait bien
ta blonde, your girlfriend
dans la seconde, within a second
lâcher quelque chose, to put something down
un cell, cell phone, mobile phone

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I saw a sign today using the verb se ramasser here in Montréal, so let’s review this verb. First things first: pronunciation.

The verb ramasser is pronounced ramâsser. That â sound in there comes close to how “aww” sounds in English. It’s only the second a that’s pronounced “aww,” not the first one.

You may remember that ramasser was included in this list of 50 words using the â sound in Québec but not written with the accented â.

Ramassez!

Ramassez!

In entry #664, we saw a little sign on a tree that told dog owners to pick up their dog crap from the street. The sign says:

Ramassez, câlisse!
Pick it up, for fuck’s sake!

OK, no, it doesn’t. It just says ramassez! They’re much more polite than me.

In entry #437, the mother in the television show Les Parent is tired of her sons’ messiness.

She uses the verb se ramasser when she says:

Ce que je vous dis souvent aussi c’est de ranger pis de vous ramasser.
What I often also tell you is to tidy up and to pick up after yourselves.

Ranger means “to tidy up.” But se ramasser is “to pick up after oneself.”

If you heard a parent say ramasse-toi to a child, the parent has said “pick up after yourself.”

On se ramasse tous ensemble

The sign that I saw today in Montréal encourages residents of the city to come together and clean up after ourselves in public places (streets, sidewalks, alleys, etc.). The sign says:

On se ramasse tous ensemble
Let’s pick up after ourselves all together

The sign says that we can sign up for the corvée. Une corvée is work carried out in public. The work is voluntary. In the case of this corvée in particular, we’re dealing with une corvée de propreté where residents come together to clean up.

If you live in Montréal, you know that the streets here look pretty nasty after all the snow has melted away in the spring…

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