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Posts Tagged ‘lesbienne’

Mado Lamotte

Click on Mado’s lovely hair to sashay away to her articles on Fugues

Not only does Montréal’s most famous drag queen have eyelashes to die for, she also has a column.

Mado Lamotte’s articles appear online and in hard copy in the city’s gay and lesbian magazine Fugues.

Last year, Mado took a trip to Ontario, la province qu’on aime bien bitcher, she says, or “the province everyone loves to bitch.”

Before she visited Toronto, she had only other people’s notions of the city in her head:

Combien de fois j’ai entendu des Québécois partis faire fortune dans la Ville Reine me dire : «C’est donc ben plate icitte, je m’ennuie de Montréal!»

I’ve heard people from Québec who’ve moved to Toronto to make lots of money say to me so many times: “It’s just so boring here, I miss Montréal!”

After hearing endless comments like that, she says it’s not hard to believe that “you always get bored and die in Ontario,” on s’ennuie toujours pour mourir en Ontario.

Besides, isn’t that what it says on Ontario’s licence plate too?

Anyway…

Mado discovered on her trip that she actually loved Ontario. She even had these nice things to say about Toronto in particular:

J’aurais jamais cru écrire ça un jour mais vraiment mes chéris, on l’a pus icitte l’affaire à Montréal. Dire qu’on a déjà été la ville la plus cool, la plus flyée, la plus too much du Canada, pis v’là-tu pas qu’on découvre que le vrai party c’est à Toronto qu’il se passe maintenant. Crack, alcool, pot, prostituées, les Torontois eux autres y savent faire le party! Rob Ford vient de détrôner Justin Bieber comme bad boy canadien de l’année. On a l’air fin nous autres avec notre Denis Coderre.

I never thought I’d write this one day but really, my dears, Montréal hasn’t got it anymore. To think we were once the coolest, the wildest, the most over-the-top city in Canada, and whaddya know, it turns out the real party is in Toronto now. Crack, alcohol, pot, prostitutes, those Torontonians sure know how to party! The mayor of Toronto, Rob Ford, has just defeated Justin Bieber as Canadian Bad Boy of the Year. We in Montréal seem “nice” with our mayor, Denis Coderre.

Yes, the city’s “Toronto the Good” reputation is definitely taking a good beating lately.

In French, Toronto’s got a nickname — la Ville Reine, or the “Queen City.” Hmm, maybe that’s why Mado ended up liking Toronto so much. She thought they named the whole city after her.

In the phrase on l’a pus icitte, l’affaire, the word pus sounds like pu. It’s an informal pronunciation of plus, when plus means “no more.” Icitte means ici. The word affaire is often used in the sense of “thing” in French: here, that “thing” is what Mado says Montréal hasn’t got anymore. Similarly, you could tell someone they’re great with: tu l’as, l’affaire!

Flyé is pronounced like the English word “fly” with é added to the end of it. Something that’s flyé is wild or “out there.”

When Mado writes eux autres y savent faire le party, the eux autres part means “them” (the people of Toronto), and y is an informal pronunciation of ils: eux autres, ils savent faire le party. Even though eux autres and y both refer to the same thing, this kind of repetition is common in French.

The expression v’la-tu pas que… is used to show surprise about something (here, that it turns out the real party’s in Toronto). This expression was also preceded by pis, which means “and” here (it’s a reduction of puis).

C’est donc ben plate icitte is pronounced cé don bin plate icitte. The expression donc ben means “very,” and plate means “boring.” Sometimes plate is also spelled platte. The masculine and feminine forms of this adjective are the same.

Je m’ennuie de Montréal means “I miss Montréal.” The expression here is s’ennuyer de quelque chose (or s’ennuyer de quelqu’un). If someone said je m’ennuie de toi, this means “I miss you.”

When pot means “marijuana” in French, the final t is pronounced.

And bitcher in French, that’s “to bitch.” There’s also la bitch, which means the same thing as its English equivalent.

_ _ _

French quotes by Mado Lamotte in:

«In et out version 2.0», Fugues, 27 janvier 2014.

«Y’a pas juste des Ontariens en Ontario», Fugues, 23 septembre 2013.

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I always look forward to reading the Montreal-based magazine Urbania.

You may remember this magazine from past entries on OffQc, where Urbania authors have devoted issues to themes like lesbiennes and bébés and the hiver québécois.

Right now I’m enjoying the summer 2012 issue of Urbania, #34.

It’s all about… les Parisiens.

From the magazine:

Reason number 2 of 25 for a Québécois to not feel inferior to a Parisian: Nous autres [les Québécois], nos sacres peuvent se décliner en verbes, en adverbes et en adjectifs.1 (Our swear words can be used as verbs, adverbs and adjectives.)

Reason number 15 of 25 for a Québécois to indeed feel inferior to a Parisian: Nous [les Parisiens], à partir de 16 ans, on range le sac à dos et on l’oublie. À jamais. Surtout avec des talons.2 (After age 16, we put the backpack away and forget about it. Forever. Especially with heels.)

Or this from a young Parisian woman named Marion: Quand je vivais à Montréal et que je m’habillais bien, c’était pour mon mec ou pour des garçons en général. À Paris, je m’habille pour mes copines. C’est elles qui portent un jugement.3 (When I lived in Montreal and would dress well, it was for my boyfriend or for boys in general. In Paris, I dress for my girlfriends. They’re the ones who pass judgement.)

In Quebec, you can find the magazine in kiosks. Here’s a list of places where you can find it in Paris.

This issue isn’t a comparison of the Parisians and Québécois. It’s about Parisians and their city. Some comparisons do come through in the writing, however. If you’re interested in reading about Parisians from an engaging québécois perspective, you’ll enjoy it. This issue is written in the usual Urbania style that makes it a pleasure to read.

Urbania also offers some content online. You can find some links to articles and videos related to this issue here.

Quoted material from Urbania, spécial Parisiens, no. 34, été 2012, Montréal.

1Marie-Andrée Labbé, “25 raisons de ne pas se sentir inférieur devant un Parisien,” p.40.

2Anne-Laure Naumowicz, “25 raisons de se sentir inférieur à un Parisien,” p.41.

3Marion, in an article written by Catherine Perreault-Lessard, “Souper de gonzesses,” p.50.

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JJ Levine

JJ Levine

In Urbania magazine issue #32 devoted to theme of lesbians, we come across the noun la butch used to refer to a lesbian with butch mannerisms: la butch, les butchs. We also find butch used as an adjective.

Is the word butch offensive? One woman interviewed in the magazine said that it was. Another woman, JJ Levine (read bio here), said that it wasn’t, and that she used the word a lot. She said that the only women who’d be offended by it were probably the ones that people considered to be butch but who didn’t identify as butch themselves.

JJ Levine cuts hair. She specialises in la coupe butch, the “butch cut.” She also calls it la coupe lesbienne. To do une coupe butch, on rase sur le côté. JJ Levine says that k.d. lang has really ugly hair, and that she’d like to give her une coupe butch classique.

When asked what she felt was THE lesbian haircut in its most clichéd form, JJ Levine mentioned a few: la coupe Longueuil (it’s a mullet: short in the front avec le pad en arrière, which the Longueuil people have the reputation of sporting; read more here), le buzzcut and la coupe emo (the emo cut).

You can read an older conversation from 2009 with JJ Levine on the Urbania website: JJ Levine, coiffeuse queer.

la butch, les butchs1, butch, butches
la coupe butch, butch cut
la coupe lesbienne, lesbian cut
raser2 sur le côté, to shave the side
la coupe Longueuil3, mullet
le pad, long hair in the back; also used to refer to a mullet
le buzzcut, buzzcut
la coupe emo, emo cut

1 the s in butchs isn’t pronounced
2 raser and rasé are pronounced râzé; the â sounds like “aww”
3 Longueuil is a city across the St. Lawrence River from Montreal

[The vocabulary in this entry comes from “JJ Levine, spécialiste des coupes butch” by Nadia Essadiqi, Urbania, numéro 32, hiver 2012, Montréal, p. 11.]

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In the Vox Pop section of the Montreal-based magazine Urbania (#32), people were asked what they thought was the biggest myth related to lesbians.

A secondary school student felt that the biggest myth was how people think that lesbians are lesbian parce qu’elles ne pognent pas avec les gars.

pogner avec les gars
to turn guys’ heads, to be lucky with guys

(Remember, gars is pronounced gâ.)

In other words, the myth that the student mentioned was how some people believe that lesbians are lesbian because they can’t attract a guy.

Similarly:

pogner avec les filles
to turn girls’ heads, to be lucky with girls

According to this, guys who dance well have more success in the pogner avec les filles department. If a guy moves well to the music, it suggests to females that he’s in good health and can reproduce.

In that case,

LUI, IL POGNE AVEC LES FILLES 🙂 :

… MAIS PAS LUI 😦 :

[This entry was inspired by “Vox Pop” (written by Joanie Guérin) in Urbania, numéro 32, hiver 2012, Montréal, page 6.]

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The winter 2012 issue of the thematic (and always fascinating) magazine Urbania is now available en kiosque. This issue, #32, is devoted to the theme of lesbiennes.

You may remember this magazine from entry #385, where the autumn issue was devoted to the theme of babies.

Over the next while, we can look at some of the vocabulary in this issue related to lesbians and homosexuality.

For this entry, let’s look at some of the language that was used in French to talk about “coming out,” or revealing one’s homosexuality.

Even though the expressions below come from an issue devoted to the theme of lesbians, they can all be used when talking about gay males too.

To say “to come out,” the expression used most often in this issue is:

  • faire son coming out

Elle a fait son coming out en 2001.
J’ai fait mon coming out à ma famille.

Another expression used in numerous articles is:

  • sortir du placard

This is the equivalent of “to come out of the closet.”

La sœur de Marge Simpson est sortie du placard en 2005.*
Il est sorti du placard.

Other expressions that appear in the issue include:

  • avouer son homosexualité
  • annoncer son homosexualité
  • révéler son homosexualité
  • afficher son homosexualité
  • sortir de la garde-robe (also sortir du garde-robe in Quebec)
  • faire sa sortie du placard

If you’re looking for interesting reading material in French with contemporary and urban vocabulary, give Urbania a try.

But be warned: Because each issue is thematic, with interesting articles and images printed on paper that feels good to touch, you may be tempted to start collecting them!

——

*Marjolaine Arcand, « 25 lesbiennes qu’on aime ». Urbania, hiver 2012, numéro 32, Montréal, page 33.

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