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Posts Tagged ‘lousse’

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In #984, I pulled together a list of informal contractions used in Québécois French and that have come up in recent videos added to OffQc.

Let’s do another list here in #985 — useful phrases from the same videos that you can learn and start using right away when you speak French. The links take you back to the original posts so you can listen again if you want.

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Found another good clip from QuébecOriginal promoting winter to European visitors. (We saw the first one here.) As usual, the French text is below the clip, followed by a translation into English and usage notes. This clip will be added to the Listen to Québécois French section.

Au Québec, on aime tellement l’humour qu’on a la seule baie au monde qui rit : la baie du Ha! Ha!

En fait, ici, tout se peut, surtout quand on se lâche lousse. «Lousse» — en liberté totale!

Des fois, la neige fait sortir le meilleur de nous. Pour avancer partout, on a réinventé la roue. Quand on veut rester au chaud, on sort nos vieux mots : tuque, chandail, combine, mitaines, bas.

Mais comme on a vraiment quatre saisons, ça se peut que vous croisiez du monde qui s’est trompé en s’habillant. Ça s’appelle le Québec!

Mais ce qu’on a de plus grand, c’est notre hiver. Le plus blanc, le plus stupéfiant des hivers. On est fiers de notre hiver. On est QuébecOriginal.

In Québec, we love humour so much that we’ve got the only laughing bay in the world: la baie du Ha! Ha! (literally Ha! Ha! Bay).

In fact, here, anything’s possible, especially when we let loose. “Lousse(from the English “loose”) — total freedom! (Lousse is a Québécois usage; the speaker is defining it for European listeners.)

Sometimes the snow brings out the best in us. To get around everywhere, we reinvented the wheel. When we want to stay warm, we pull out our old words: tuque(tuque/winter hat), “chandail(sweater), “combine(from combinaison, long johns/long underwear; can also be the piece of clothing that covers the entire body and buttons down the chest), “mitaines(mittens), “bas(socks). (These words are all Québécois usages.)

But because we’ve really got four seasons, it’s possible you’ll bump into someone who got dressed wrong. That’s Québec!

But the best thing we’ve got is winter. The whitest, most stupefying of winters. We’re proud of our winter. We are QuébecOriginal.

Notes:

se lâcher lousse, to let loose, to let it all hang out, to let ‘er rip
Note how the speaker pronounces lâche; it uses the â sound. She says it quickly, but try to hear it.

Note how she pronounces lousse. It sounds slightly different to the English loose. The words mousse, pousse, rousse, etc., all use that same vowel sound.

Note how the speaker pronounces bas. The words pas, cas, tas, t’as all rhyme with this, using that same vowel sound. We heard this vowel sound before in the words pas and chat in this video.

tuque, nom féminin
chandail, nom masculin
combine, nom féminin
bas, nom masculin
mitaine, nom féminin

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I came across an ad in a Montréal métro station for a gym offering cardio, musculation and cours en groupe.

Part of the ad reads:

Soyez lousse dans vos jeans et dans votre budget!
Literally: Be “loose” in your jeans and in your budget!

Click on the thumbnail to see a larger version.

The idea is that if you become a member of this gym, both your jeans and your budget will finally fit.

But what about the word lousse?

Lousse derives from the English word “loose.” It’s a colloquial usage that you’ll sometimes hear in regular, everyday conversations.

In fact, maybe you’ve already heard the word lousse before in the colloquial expression se lâcher lousse (to have a great time, to let loose, s’éclater, etc.).

On s’est lâchés lousses à Québec!
We really let loose in Québec City! We had an amazing time! We went all out!

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Portraits de Montréal published an interesting story on Facebook about a man who grew up in a family of farmers.

The man tells us that he loved the farm while growing up, and that he wanted to become a farmer himself. But he also tells us that his father saw things very differently.

His father sold the farm because he was only in it for the money and couldn’t understand why his son would care. He used drugs and beat his son.

You can read the text here.

It contains vocabulary that I thought you’d like to learn — vocabulary related to being a farmer and problems with the man’s father.

1. Être fermier, c’est l’fun au bout.
Being a farmer is so much fun.

Bout here would’ve been pronounced as boutte when the speaker said it. The expression au boutte means “totally.”

2. Il est de même.
He’s like that.
That’s the way he is.

De même here means comme ça.

3. Lui, il était là-dedans pour l’argent.
He was in it for the money.

4. Moi, je m’en crissais de l’argent.
I didn’t give a damn about the money.

Je m’en crisse means “I don’t give a damn.”

5. Elle est donc ben propre la grange!
The barn is just so clean!

Donc is pronounced don here. The original text on Facebook contains a spelling error: donc was spelled incorrectly as dont.

6. Câlisse ton camp.
Get the hell out of there.

Camp sounds like quand. Don’t pronounce the p.

7. La vache était loose dans son enclos.
The cow was loose in its pen, enclosure.

The spelling lousse is also used.

8. Je mangeais une volée.
I used to take a beating.
I used to get beaten up.

The expression is manger une volée.

9. Mon père était fucké.
My father was fucked up.

10. Il sniffait.
He used to sniff, snort drugs.

11. de la coke
coke (cocaine)

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