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Posts Tagged ‘magasinage’

Six oranges, check. Five tomatoes, check. One locally grown child, check.

Last week, I went to a supermarket called Maxi.

At Maxi, you have to put une piasse (1 $) into a device on le panier (shopping cart) to release it from the other ones. The panier only accepts one-dollar coins.

When I had finished shopping and returned my panier, two women approached me. One of them asked if she could take my piasse in exchange for four quarters so that she could take a panier.

She asked:

Est-ce que je peux prendre ta piasse pour quatre vingt-cinq sous?
Can I take your loonie [one-dollar coin] for four quarters?

At Maxi, there’s a large sign posted at the spot where customers return their paniers in the parking lot, le stationnement.

I took a photo of the sign so that you could see it and learn French vocabulary from it.

Some of the vocabulary on the sign includes: dépôt, se procurer un panier, retourner le panier, magasiner, passer à la caisse, déverrouiller un panier, monnaie, jeton réutilisable.

The word panier doesn’t just refer to shopping carts with wheels, though.

I found another sign that uses the word panier on it at the entrance to a store called Dollarama.

On this sign, shoppers are told to use a panier (basket) when shopping in the store, and not one of their own sacs réutilisables, reusable bags.

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This ad comes from a website where job offers are posted: jobgo.ca.

I first came across this ad in the métro in Montréal (but I borrowed the image above from their website).

Magasiner : 6 heures
Gagner sa vie : 100 000 heures
AIME TA JOB.

Shopping: 6 hours
Earning a living: 100 000 hours
LOVE YOUR JOB.

There are two québécois usages in this ad.
Can you identify them?

1. The first québécois usage is magasiner. This verb means “to shop,” and it’s not used anywhere else in the French-speaking world. Similarly, the masculine noun magasinage means “shopping.” The people who do the shopping are called un magasineur or une magasineuse.

Spelling tip: These words derive from magasin, so they’re always spelled with an s (magasiner, magasinage, etc.) and never a z (magaziner, magazinage). They aren’t spelled with a z because they don’t derive from magazine.

magasiner en ligne
to shop online

faire un peu de magasinage
to take in a bit of shopping

magasiner un nouveau lit
to go shopping for a new bed
to shop around for a new bed

2. The second québécois usage is ta job. Elsewhere in the French-speaking world, job is masculine. Job is sometimes masculine in Québec too, particularly in writing. The feminine usage is much more of a spoken form. So, it’s kind of interesting to see the feminine form used in the ad above, rather than the masculine one.

Here’s an informal expression heard in Québec using la job:

Ça va faire la job!
That’ll do the job!
That’ll do the trick!

A related word is une jobine, which refers informally to smaller projects, temporary work, summer jobs, etc.

On the United Way Ottawa website, there’s a testimonial from a guy called Joshua about how the United Way helped him. He said: “(They) helped me find a job that wasn’t just a pay cheque: it’s a career.”

In the French translation of what Joshua said, we get a good sense of the difference between the words carrière and jobine: « Ils m’ont aidé à trouver une carrière, et pas juste une jobine avec un chèque de paie. »

Because job and jobine derive from the English “job,” they are pronounced with an English j sound, not a French one.

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On an STM bus, a young man said on débarque ici to a friend sitting beside him, or “let’s get off here.”

A friend offered me a diet Pepsi to drink, un Pepsi diète.

The Pepsi was in a can, en canette.

A doctor that I won’t be seeing anymore had his receptionist call me. She said je ferme votre dossier, or “I’m closing your file.”

A sign at a fast food restaurant said veuillez faire la ligne ici, or “please line up here.”

Two friends wished each other a happy noon lunch break by saying bon midi! and bon lunch! to each other.

I saw a sign in shopping centre that said bon magasinage!, or “happy shopping!”

A Latin American tourist asked her husband what on signs outside buildings in Montréal could possibly mean. It’s the equivalent of a one-bedroom apartment available for rent.

Signs that read logement à louer mean that there’s an apartment available for rent.

The words diète and midi from above are dzidzu words. Diète is pronounced dziète and midi is pronounced midzi.

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Métro, boulot, dodo…

This French expression refers to the humdrum of everyday life.

You take the métro in the morning to go to your boulot (work), go home after work to go dodo (to sleep), then wake up the next morning and do it all again.

Boulot is an informal word for work. Dodo is a word used by children (and their parents!) meaning sleep or bedtime.

The STM is displaying an ad to promote an illimited weekend pass to use public transport. With the pass, it’s not métro, boulot, dodo but…

bus, stade, hot-dog, métro, concert, pub, dodo, bagel, bus, musée, smoked meat, métro, planétarium, métro, terrasse, dimsum, métro, la Ronde, barbe à papa, bus, bar, poutine, bus, dodo, brunch, métro, tam-tams, magasinage, bus, calèche, plage, métro, sushi, casino, bus, dodo!

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In the French of Québec, you’ll come across the verb magasiner in the sense of “to shop.”

A shopper is un magasineur or une magasineuse.

Here are examples of ways that I’ve heard these words used in the past few days.

magasiner un matelas
to shop for a mattress

magasiner en ligne
to shop online

magasiner l’esprit en paix
to shop with peace of mind

une magasineuse compulsive
a compulsive shopper

In this Urbania interview, you can read the confessions of une magasineuse pathologique who, among other things, owns 200 pairs of shoes. She says:

Quand j’achète quelque chose, c’est comme un fix. Je ne prends pas de drogue, mais je m’achète des affaires. Mon buzz dure une heure maximum.

When I buy something, it’s like getting a fix (of drugs). I don’t do drugs, but I do buy stuff. My buzz lasts a maximum of one hour.

Where do you put 200 pairs of shoes?

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