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Posts Tagged ‘Martin Matte’

Here are 5 photos I found lurking on my phone waiting to be commented and put on OffQc! You can click on all the images for the large version.

1. Dans les allées, utilisez un panier

Literally, this means: in the aisles, use a cart, but what we’re meant to understand here is that, while shopping in the store, you shouldn’t place products in your reusable bags; you should place them in a shopping cart. This is to prevent theft.

une allée
aisle (in a shop)

un panier
shopping cart

2. Veuillez garder votre chien en laisse

I saw this sign on the front door of a pet shop. Une laisse is a leash, so management are telling us to keep dogs on a leash when in the shop.

être en laisse
to be on a leash

3. Partagez le plaisir en jouant au tic tac toe avec un ami

This photo is of the side of a box of timbits (small doughnut balls sold at Tim Hortons). The English on the other side of the box read: Share the fun and play tic tac toe with a friend.

A reader of OffQc asked a while back what tic tac toe was called in French, so I took a photo when I saw this.

jouer au tic tac toe
to play tic tac toe

4. Hot-dogs, tout garnis

Over on the right in smaller text are the words tout garnis. A hot-dog that’s tout garni has all the toppings on it.

Another word for hot-dog is roteux, which is an informal usage. Although the term chien-chaud exists (literal translation of hot dog), its use is rare nowadays.

I did manage to catch a photo of the old sign at Chien-chaud Victoire in Montréal before it was finally taken down several years ago.

un hot-dog
a hot dog

tout garni
the works

5. Au diable l’hiver…

This photo was taken in April, just after winter had ended. It’s the front window of a clothing shop, and the words mean to hell with winter, or literally to the devil (with) winter.

au diable l’hiver
to hell with winter

Remember this list of 50 words using the â sound but aren’t actually spelled with the accented â? We could add diable to it. That’s because the a in diable sounds somewhere between the English aw and ow, which is the sound made by â in Québécois French.

If you don’t what â sounds like, you’ll hear Martin Matte pronounce it in this video when he says j’me fâche and tasse-toi. You’ll hear this sound very frequently when listening to French spoken by the Québécois.

But that’s not all…
Diable has a few more things of note in the pronunciation department. One of them is that the d in this word sounds like dz. That’s because d is pronounced dz before the French i and u sounds. (If you say the English words lads, pads and fads aloud, you’ve just pronounced the dz sound. These words sound like ladz, padz and fadz.) This means mardi sounds like mardzi, dur sounds like dzur, and diable like dziâble.

Hold on, not finished yet…
The le ending, like in table or possible, is often not enunciated in informal language. That’s why table can be pronounced informally as tab’, possible as possib’, and diable as dziâb’.

Oh! Just one more thing…
You may hear diable pronounced as ’iâb’ (sounds like yâb), where, in addition to the dropping of the final le, the initial d (or the initial dz sound) also drops. You may hear this pronunciation, for example, in Québécois folk music or folk tales. A similar thing happens when bon Dieu is pronounced as bon ’ieu (sounds like bon yeu). There’s a song by Les Colocs called Bonyeu that you can look for. «Bonyeu, donne-moé une job, faut que j’fasse mes paiements…»

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Here’s another short clip. Try to listen first without consulting the text below. This video features Martin Matte again, like the last one from #959. This video will be added to the Listen section.

— Qu’est-ce que tu regardes?

— Ha ha, oh attends, là… C’est parce que j’ai tapé «grosse chatte» sur l’écran parce que j’voulais trouver un moyen pour faire maigrir le chat, j’trouve ça p’us d’allure, pis j’su’ tombé là-dessus…

— Juste un problème, c’est qu’on a pas d’chat.

— Oh, tu vas rire, c’est cave, là… j’ai toujours été certain qu’on avait un chat. C’est, c’est, c’est bizarre. On sort de d’là! T’essayes, de toute façon…

— What are you watching?

— Ha ha, oh hold on… It’s just because I typed “big pussy [cat]” on the screen because I wanted to find a way to make the cat lose weight, I think it’s become ridiculous, and I stumbled on this…

— There’s just one problem; we don’t have a cat.

— Oh, you’re gonna laugh, it’s silly… I’ve always been sure we had a cat. That, that, that’s weird. Let’s get outta here. We’ll try to anyway…

Usage and pronunciation notes

j’trouve ça p’us d’allure, I think it’s become ridiculous, gone too far (the related expression ç’a pas d’allure means that’s ridiculous, insane, etc.)
p’us, informal contraction of plus; sounds like pu
pis, 
informal contraction of puis
j’su’, 
informal contraction of je suis; sounds like chu
pas d’chat, listen to how pas d’chat (from pas de chat) is pronounced so you’ll recognise it
cave, stupid, silly
de d’là, informal pronunciation of de là (we saw de d’là before in ôte-toi de d’là)

Listen to the difference in pronunciation between chat and chatte. The vowel a is not pronounced the same way in the two words.

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In the video below, which is a car ad featuring Martin Matte, you’ll hear features of spoken language used in Québécois French that have come up in recent posts.

Give it a listen. It’s short (30 seconds). The text is transcribed below, with notes. There are a few examples of the â sound, so listen for it.

This will be added to the Listen section, along with the other clips.

Avance! Là, là, là, là. Le nouveau CRV est assez remarquable. C’est un véhicule inspiré par la liberté, conçu pour rouler dans de grands espaces — sauf quand t’es pris quelque part!

Moi, c’est rare [que] j’me fâche, mais là, là, c’est… Tasse-toi, grosse vache! Dégage! Ça fait une heure et demie que j’attends, . T’es pas toute seule, hein?

Move [advance]! Ay, ay, ay. The new CRV is pretty remarkable. It’s a vehicle inspired by freedom, made to drive in open spaces — except when you’re stuck somewhere [i.e., in traffic]!

I don’t usually get angry, but this time, I’m… [but now, it’s…]. Get out of the way, you fat cow! Move! I’ve been waiting for an hour and a half. You’re not the only one here, uh?

Pronunciation and usage notes

c’est un, pronounced cé t’un
espaces, pronounced espâces, with â
t’es, informal contraction of tu es, sounds like
rare, pronounced râre, with â
j’me, informal contraction of je me
fâche, pronounced with â
mais là, là…,
 but now… (but this time…)
tasse-toi, pronounced tâsse-toi, with â
là,
often heard at end of sentences in informal language
t’es pas, informal contraction of tu n’es pas, sounds like té pas

Related:
Ôte-toi de d’là, from entry #949

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L'accent québécoisThe â sound is one of the most distinctive features of the québécois accent.

You can always identify a French speaker from Québec by listening for the â sound!

The sound made by â in Québec sounds something like “aww” to an English speaker.

To hear â pronounced, listen to Ricardo pronounce carré, or hear Martin Matte pronounce câline and passait. All three of these words use the â sound.

The â sound occurs in words written with the accented â (like âge and fâché), but it can occur in certain words written with an unaccented letter a too (like tasse and case).

When the word is written with the accented â, there’s little doubt — say aww! But when it’s written with an unaccented letter a, it isn’t as obvious if it takes the â sound. That said, you may begin to notice some patterns.

To help you out a bit, below are 50 words taking the â sound in Québec but all written with an unaccented letter a. I’ve underlined the letter a in each word that makes the â sound.

This list isn’t exhaustive, it’s just a list of 50 words that I felt were useful.

  1. amasser
  2. barrage
  3. barreau
  4. barrer
  5. barrière
  6. bas
  7. base
  8. baser
  9. basse
  10. brassage
  11. brasser
  12. brasserie
  13. carré
  14. carreau
  15. carrément
  16. cas
  17. case
  18. casier
  19. casse-croûte
  20. casser
  21. chat
  22. classe
  23. classement
  24. classer
  25. classeur
  26. dépasser
  27. entasser
  28. espace
  29. gars
  30. gaz
  31. gazer
  32. gazeux
  33. jaser
  34. jasette
  35. matelas
  36. paille
  37. pas
  38. passage
  39. passager
  40. passe
  41. passeport
  42. passer
  43. ramassage
  44. ramasser
  45. rasage
  46. raser
  47. surpasser
  48. tas
  49. tasse
  50. tasser

Remember, the letters rs in gars aren’t pronounced. This word sounds like gâ. The final s in bas, cas, matelas, pas, tas is silent. These words sound like bâ, câ, matlâ, pâ, tâ.

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Comedian Martin Matte reminds us of the importance of instilling a sense of respect in children for their parents.

When watching the videos on this blog, listen a few times without peeking at the French transcription first.

Un autre p’tit truc, un enfant doit apprendre à respecter son père en toutes circonstances. Alors il faut surtout pas hésiter à mettre son respect à l’épreuve.

— Papa, j’aime pas ça quand tu viens me chercher à l’école, ça me gêne!

— Oh! Qu’est-ce qu’y’a là, hein? T’as honte de ton papa? Est-ce que c’est ça? Vous avez honte de votre papa? Il faut jamais avoir honte de son père. Allez jouer, là. Par là-bas! Va jouer…

Tss… Tu fais tout pour eux pis c’est comme ça qu’ils te remercient…

ça me gêne, it embarrasses me, it bothers me
qu’est-ce qu’y’a (informal) = qu’est-ce qu’il y a
t’as (informal) = tu as
pis (informal) = puis

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A short clip from the humoriste québécois Martin Matte. 🙂

Attention! On s’en va dans la toilette!

(ouch)

Oh là là là là! Câline! Pourquoi tu l’as pas dit à papa que ça passait pas, mon grand? Hein?

Papa il jouera plus avec toi, là! Aaahh…


câline, gosh darnit
que ça passait pas, that there wasn’t room to pass through
mon grand, big guy
il,
he pronounced this informally as y

P.S. Heh heh, no children were injured in the making of this video (in case you’re not familiar with Martin Matte’s irreverent style!) 😉

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