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Posts Tagged ‘moumoune’

A good expression to learn is arrête donc de. With this expression, you can tell people to stop doing whatever it is that’s bothering you.

Google is our friend again. I typed arrête donc de to find 10 things that people want others to stop doing.

Donc is pronounced don here. I’ll use the spelling don’ to help you remember.

I’ve translated arrête don’ de in the examples as “stop (doing whatever)” and “stop (doing whatever), will you.”

Arrête don’ de chiâler contre les chiâleux.
Stop complaining about people who complain.

T’aimes pas ça te faire gosser?
Ben arrête don’ de gosser les autres.
You don’t like to be bugged?
Well stop bugging others then.

Arrête don’ de faire ta moumoune.
Stop acting like a sissy, will you.

Arrête don’ de capoter pour rien.
Stop freaking out for nothing.

Arrête don’ de dire des niaiseries.
Stop saying such stupid things, will you.
Stop talking nonsense, will you.

Arrête don’ de blâmer les joueurs.
Stop blaming the players.

Arrête don’ de péter d’la broue.
Stop showing off. (Péter sounds like pèté.)

Don’t forget the form arrêtez donc de, of course. This one can be used when speaking to more than one person.

Arrêtez don’ de bitcher sur les posts des autres!
Stop bitching on other people’s posts!

Arrêtez don’ de niaiser, c’est sérieux tout ça.
Stop messing around, this is serious stuff.

Arrêtez don’ de chercher des bibittes partout!
Stop finding fault with everything!
Stop looking for problems everywhere!

I’ll end with this note about the word une bibitte: it means “bug” (insect). So the last example literally means “stop looking for bugs everywhere.” This word is also said as une bébitte. We’ll look more closely at how this word is used in another entry.

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It’s been a while since we’ve looked at some French language from the TV show Les Parent. Let’s look at a scene from season 5, where we come across the québécois usages épeurant, moumoune and ben correct.

The scene:

Louis Parent has received his cousin Kevin Parent as a guest at his place. (Kevin is played by real-life singer Kevin Parent.)

During Kevin’s stay, a character called Marie takes a liking to him. Marie is a friend of the Parent family. She wants to watch a scary movie with Kevin late at night hoping to put the moves on him.

When Marie is alone in the living room with Kevin, she begins to flirt, using the subject of the scary movie that she’s about to see as her excuse:

Est-ce que c’est très épeurant comme film? Parce que moi j’suis vraiment moumoune.
Is it a really scary movie? Because I’m a real scaredy-cat.

Kevin doesn’t seem to be into Marie. He responds:

Non, c’est un peu dur, mais c’est pas vraiment épeurant. Tu vas être ben correcte.
No, it’s a bit rough but it’s not really scary. You’re gonna be just fine.

épeurant, scary
moumoune*, scaredy-cat, wimp, sissy
ben correct, just fine

*A note about une moumoune:

In the quote above, Marie used moumoune as an adjective to refer to herself as someone who gets scared easily. This word can become offensive if a gay male is referred to as une moumoune.

[Language taken from Les Parent, “Kevin qui vient dîner,” season 5, episode 1, Radio-Canada, Montréal, 17 September 2012.]

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