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Posts Tagged ‘niaiser’

When you think of verbs unique to Québécois French, which ones come to mind?

There are many of course, but here are OffQc’s choices for five typically Québécois French verbs.

1. POGNER

This verb is used in the sense of catching or “landing” something, like the flu (pogner la grippe) or a ticket (pogner un ticket).

Je viens de pogner un ticket parce que je textais à une lumière rouge.

I just got a ticket because I was texting at a red light.

Pronunciation tip:

Pogner is pronounced ponyé.

Keep reading… Everything you ever wanted to know about the Québécois French verb pogner.

2. NIAISER

This verb has different uses, but the most common is probably the one where it’s used in the sense of joking around.

Arrête don’ de niaiser, tes jokes plates me font pas rire.

Stop joking around, your bad jokes aren’t making me laugh.

Pronunciation tip:

Niaiser is pronounced nyèzé.

Keep reading… Everything you ever wanted to know about the Québécois French verb niaiser.

3. TRIPPER

When you “trip” in Québécois, you’re really into something or having a great time. It comes from English drug slang.

Ma job me fait tripper!

I totally love my job!

Usage tips:

Learn the expression tripper sur. Je trippe fort sur la soie dentaire. I totally love dental floss.

Use dessus when what you love is not stated because it’s understood. Je trippe fort dessus. I totally love it.

This verb is also spelled triper. Take your pick!

4. CAPOTER

The root of the verb capoter contains cap, which refers to the head. Quand tu capotes, that’s exactly what you lose — your head.

Hey man, capote pas, c’est pas grave.

Hey man, don’t lose it, it’s not a big deal.

5. ÉCOEURER

You can tell a friend (or non-friend!) to stop teasing or picking on you with the verb écoeurer. Depending on the context, écoeurer quelqu’un can mean “to pick on someone, to poke fun at someone, to tease someone, to take a dig at someone…”

Arrête de m’écoeurer avec ça.

Stop teasing me about that. Stop picking on me about that.

Pronunciation tip:

Écoeurer is pronounced ékeuré.

Keep reading… The related adjective écoeurant has both a negative and positive sense in Québécois French.

Got any verbs to add to this list?
Let me know in the comments.

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A good expression to learn is arrête donc de. With this expression, you can tell people to stop doing whatever it is that’s bothering you.

Google is our friend again. I typed arrête donc de to find 10 things that people want others to stop doing.

Donc is pronounced don here. I’ll use the spelling don’ to help you remember.

I’ve translated arrête don’ de in the examples as “stop (doing whatever)” and “stop (doing whatever), will you.”

Arrête don’ de chiâler contre les chiâleux.
Stop complaining about people who complain.

T’aimes pas ça te faire gosser?
Ben arrête don’ de gosser les autres.
You don’t like to be bugged?
Well stop bugging others then.

Arrête don’ de faire ta moumoune.
Stop acting like a sissy, will you.

Arrête don’ de capoter pour rien.
Stop freaking out for nothing.

Arrête don’ de dire des niaiseries.
Stop saying such stupid things, will you.
Stop talking nonsense, will you.

Arrête don’ de blâmer les joueurs.
Stop blaming the players.

Arrête don’ de péter d’la broue.
Stop showing off. (Péter sounds like pèté.)

Don’t forget the form arrêtez donc de, of course. This one can be used when speaking to more than one person.

Arrêtez don’ de bitcher sur les posts des autres!
Stop bitching on other people’s posts!

Arrêtez don’ de niaiser, c’est sérieux tout ça.
Stop messing around, this is serious stuff.

Arrêtez don’ de chercher des bibittes partout!
Stop finding fault with everything!
Stop looking for problems everywhere!

I’ll end with this note about the word une bibitte: it means “bug” (insect). So the last example literally means “stop looking for bugs everywhere.” This word is also said as une bébitte. We’ll look more closely at how this word is used in another entry.

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ma-vie-cest-de-la-marde-francais-quebecois

Ma vie, c’est d’la marde.

Ma vie, c’est d’la marde.
My life is shitty.
[His life is shitty because he got D+ at school. Well, at least he got the +.]

Stresse pas, bro!
La vie est si belle!
Don’t stress out, bro!
Life is so nice!

C’est vrai, au moins il fait beau en esti!
That’s true, at least it’s fuckin’ nice out!

Hehe, j’niaisais!
Hehe, I was kidding!

_ _ _

[…] en esti, fucking […]
c’est beau en esti!, that’s fucking nice!
t’es hot en esti!, you’re fucking hot!

niaiser, to kid, to joke
arrête de niaiser!, stop kidding around!
me niaises-tu?, are you kidding me?

+ 13 example sentences of the québécois marde here.

Bon lundi!

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Here’s a funny exchange of textos (text messages) from the television show Les Parent.

Thomas receives a texto from his younger brother, who’s in a predicament. He leads his younger brother to believe he won’t help him out.

Click on the image for a larger version.

Peux-tu venir me chercher? J’ai oublié ma passe au cégep pis j’ai pu de cash.
Can you come get me? I forgot my pass at the cégep and I don’t have any more cash.

Quête.
Beg.

Ben oui, tsé.
Yeah, right.

Marche.
Walk.

Ça va me prendre 2h?!
It’ll take me 2hrs?!

Sûrement 🙂
No doubt 🙂

Pire frère EVER!!!
Worst brother EVER!!!

Relaxe, je niaisais.
Relax, I was just kidding.

_ _ _

une passe
a pass [for public transport]

un cégep
an educational institution in Québec
English explanation on Wikipedia

j’ai pu de cash
= je n’ai plus de cash

quêter
to beg, to panhandle

tsé
= tu sais

ben oui, tsé
literally: well yeah, ya know
(used sarcastically)

niaiser
to joke around, to kid

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Casa d’Italia à Montréal (métro Jean-Talon)

I’ve been keeping my ears open for you! Here are 10 new examples of overheard French.

All 10 are spontaneous examples that I caught someone say while out and about in Montréal.

1. Arrête de niaiser!

Stop kidding around!
Stop messing with me!

Two young women in their 20s were walking and talking in the street.

One of the women then stopped the other. She exclaimed arrête de niaiser because she was so taken aback by whatever her friend had said.

2. Je prendrais…

I’ll take…
Can I get…?

A lady ordered food at the cash of a restaurant by saying je prendrais…

We’ve also seen the expression je vais prendre… on OffQc, as well as just stating what you want followed by s’il vous plaît.

Je prendrais un café, s’il vous plaît.
Je vais prendre un café, s’il vous plaît.
Un café, s’il vous plaît.

3. T’as quel âge?

How old are you?

Two young teenagers were talking to each other. This is how one of them asked the other his age.

4. Bonne fin de journée!

Enjoy the rest of your day!

An elderly lady said this to a group of friends as she left them. It was three o’clock in the afternoon. Cashiers in stores also say this a lot to customers.

The word de isn’t stressed. Try saying it like this: bonne finde journée, where finde sounds like a one-syllable word.

5. Finalement j’ai rien.

There’s nothing wrong me after all.
Turns out I’m fine.

A girl answered her mobile phone. I think it was her grandmother calling. The girl explained that she had just left hospital and that there was nothing wrong with her after all.

J’ai rien is an informal way of saying je n’ai rien.

6. Merci, t’es fine.

Thanks, you’re so kind (nice, sweet).

The same girl from number 5 said this on the phone.

Fine is the feminine form. Fin is the masculine. Fine rhymes with the French word mine. Fin rhymes with the French word main.

Merci, t’es fine is said to a female. For a male, you’d say: merci, t’es fin.

The adjectives gentil and gentille are used in Québec too, of course.

The masculine gentil sounds like jen-tsi. In the feminine, the tille part of gentille rhymes with fille. You’ll remember that the letter t in both gentil and gentille is pronounced ts.

That’s because the letter t is pronounced ts before the French i sound. The letter t is also pronounced ts before the French u sound. This is what’s known as the tsitsu on OffQc. For example, partir is pronounced par-tsir in Québec, and tuque is pronounced tsuk.

You can also use c’est gentil to thank someone, male or female:

Merci, c’est gentil.
Thanks, that’s kind (of you).

7. Fais pas comme si tu m’avais pas vue!

Don’t pretend you didn’t see me!

A girl said this to a guy as he walked by. She jokingly accused him of pretending that he hadn’t seen her to avoid saying hello to her.

If a guy had said this, it would be written like this: fais pas comme si tu m’avais pas vu!

Fais pas! is an informal way of saying ne fais pas!

8. Tu m’entends-tu?

Can you hear me?

A girl in her 20s said this while speaking on the phone. The person she was speaking to couldn’t hear her very well.

The second tu in her question is an informal yes-no question word. The first tu means “you,” but the second one doesn’t. To learn more about this, you can download a mini-guide about yes-no questions using tu.

When pronounced, her question sounded like: tsu m’entends-tsu? That’s the tsitsu again! (See number 6.)

9. Dans une tasse ou dans un carton?

In a mug or in a paper cup?

I stopped in a café that will serve their coffee in both mugs and paper cups. A lady in line ahead of me ordered a coffee. The cashier asked if she wanted the coffee in a mug (to drink the coffee there) or in a paper cup (to go). Dans une tasse ou dans un carton?

10. Oui, toi?

Fine, and you?

When you ask somebody ça va? (how are you?), the response will often be a simple oui, toi?

Answering oui to ça va? is the equivalent of saying “fine” to the question “how are you?” You can add in toi? to ask about the other person and sound less curt. Of course, there’s nothing stopping you from giving a more enthusiastic response than just oui!

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You can’t pass for a native without mastering the québécois verb niaiser!

You’ve seen this verb before in “Everything you ever wanted to know about the québécois verb niaiser.” Here are some new examples for review. Using the phonetic alphabet, niaiser is pronounced [njɛze], which sounds like nyèzé.

1. Je te niaise pas, je te parle sérieusement.

This is taken from an interview by Les Francs Tireurs. It means: “I’m not kidding you. I’m being serious.” We can tell that the person was speaking informally because, instead of je ne te niaise pas, he left out ne and said je te niaise pas.

In fact, what he most likely said was j’te niaise pas, which sounds like ch’te niaise pas. When je and te come together, they often contract and the j makes a ch sound.

The same goes for the je te combination je te parle sérieusement, which you may hear pronounced as j’te (ch’te) parle sérieusement.

2. Arrête de me niaiser là, c’est pas drôle!

This means: “Stop messing with me, it’s not funny!” It comes from a book called Fais-moi confiance by Andréanne Parenteau.

This example also includes the famous québécois , which you can explore in “Everything you ever wanted to know about the québécois use of .”

3. Niaise pas avec les gars en uniforme!

This example comes from a blog. It means “Don’t mess with guys in uniforms!” Remember, the letters rs in gars aren’t pronounced, so gars sounds like gâ.

This is also an example of dropping ne in an informal style because the author wrote niaise pas instead of ne niaise pas.

4. J’ai niaisé pendant deux mois.

This example comes from a comment left online. In full, the commenter wrote: J’ai niaisé pendant deux mois et demi avant de me trouver une job, “I did absolutely nothing for two and a half months before I found a job.” In this example, niaiser is used in the sense of goofing around, doing nothing.

During conversations, you’ll hear job in the feminine in Québec: une job.

5. Ils m’ont fait niaiser trois semaines pour rien! Câlisse.

This example comes from an online forum. It means: “They made me wait three weeks for nothing! Fuck.” Here, faire niaiser is used in the sense of making someone wait. This example also includes câlisse, which equates to saying “fuck” in Québec. You can also now review the expression je m’en câlisse.

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Here are 7 random expressions in French that I overheard in Montréal this week and made a mental note of.

1. Tu me niaises-tu?
(Are you kidding me?)

When the métro train I was on pulled into the station, it came to a stop, and then the lights and motor when off completely. A young woman near me, standing with her friend, exclaimed: tu me niaises-tu? She was frustrated that a long delay seemed imminent. An older woman behind me yelled out sarcastically: super!

2. Allô? Allô? Ça coupe!
(Hello? Hello? You’re cutting in and out!)

A man talking on his mobile phone couldn’t hear what the person on the other end was saying. He kept saying allô? allô? and then ça coupe! The connection was obviously bad.

3. Y mouille un p’tit peu.
(It’s spitting out.)

The verb mouiller is often used in the same way as pleuvoir in Québec. Someone who says il mouille is saying the same thing as il pleut. The man who said this also said un p’tit peu. It was only spitting out when he said it.

4. Voulez-vous la facture?
(Do you want the receipt?)

When you order food at the cash, like in a food court, the cashier may ask if you want the receipt. You’ll hear a lot of employees working at the cash refer to the receipt as la facture.

5. En régulier?
(By regular post?)

I took an envelope to the post office. The man working at the cash asked if I wanted to send it by regular post: en régulier? If you wanted to send an envelope by regular post, you could say: en régulier, s’il vous plaît.

6. On va checker ça.
(We’ll check it out. We’ll take a look.)

A guy speaking into his mobile phone said this to the person on the other end. If you heard someone say check-moi ça! or even just check!, it means “check it out!” or “take a look at that!”

7. C’est moins dispendieux.
(It’s less expensive.)

An employee in Pharmaprix was showing a product to a customer. She told her that product was less expensive, moins dispendieux, than another similiar product. This means exactly the same thing as moins cher, which is of course also said in Québec. The word dispendieux looks big and fancy and formal, but it’s not. It really does just mean the same thing as cher in Québec.

And an image…

In entry #631, you read about how the Québécois use the word vidanges in the sense of garbage. In the comments, roxannabanana asked if this word is always used in the plural.

In the sense of garbage, yes, vidanges is used in the plural. You may come across the singular form when vidange is used to refer to an oil change in a vehicle, however.

In the image, taken at a garage, we read: vidange d’huile (oil change) above the door on the left. This usage in the sense of oil change is known throughout the French-speaking world, but the plural usage in the sense of garbage is québécois.

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