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Posts Tagged ‘niaiser’

I found this video from QuébecOriginal (Tourisme Québec) promoting winter in Québec. In it, you’ll hear a few Québécois usages that we’ve looked at on OffQc.

This video was made to promote Québec to the European francophone market, which is why the speaker provides a couple definitions as she speaks.

L’hiver au Québec — attache ta tuque!

Tuque = bonnet de laine.

L’hiver, on marche, on court, on rame, on glisse, on promène les chiens, et ici le hockey, c’t’une religion. Eh bon, on s’calme le pompon!

Bref, l’hiver, pas l’temps d’niaiser.

Niaiser = perdre son temps.

On en profite au maximum. On a les mains froides, mais le coeur chaud. Ça, ça s’explique pas ; ça se ressent. Faut venir le vivre.

On est QuébecOriginal.

Winter in Québec — hold onto your tuque/hat! (Prepare yourself! Brace yourself!)

Tuque = woolly hat/winter hat. (Tuque is a Québécois usage; the speaker is providing bonnet de laine as an equivalent for the benefit of European listeners.)

In the winter, we walk, we run, we row, we slide, we walk the dogs, and hockey is a religion here… OK, let’s settle down now!

In short, no time to “niaiser” (waste time doing nothing) in the winter. (Time to get busy.)

Niaiser = waste your time. (The speaker is explaining to the European audience again; here, she’s defining the verb niaiser, which is a Québécois usage.)

We take full advantage. Our hands are cold, but out hearts are warm. You can’t explain it; you have to feel it. You have to come and live it.

We are QuébecOriginal.

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Can you say the five English sentences below in an informal style of French? Say your answer aloud, applying whatever informal contractions are possible.

In the answers below, I’ve given both an informal, spoken version and a version without contractions so that you can see the difference between the two.

Say in French

  1. I’m not kidding you.
  2. Now I’ve had it! (use tanné in your answer)
  3. You’re not serious?! (as in: Are you for real?!)
  4. Ha! That’s a good one!
  5. We’re gonna talk about that.

Answers

The versions typically heard in spoken language are in blue.

1. I’m not kidding you. Je ne te niaise pas, which can be heard in spoken language as j’te niaise pas. The contracted j’te sounds like ch’te.

2. Now I’ve had it! Là, je suis tanné!, which can be heard in spoken language as là, j’su’ tanné! The contracted j’su’ sounds like chu.

3. You’re not serious?! Tu n’es pas sérieux?!, which can be heard in spoken language as t’es pas sérieux?! The contracted t’es sounds like té.

4. Ha! That’s a good one! Ha! Elle est bien bonne, celle-là!, which can be heard in spoken language as Ha! ‘Est ben bonne, celle-là! The contracted ‘est sounds like è. Ben sounds like the French word bain.

5. We’re gonna talk about that. On va parler de ça, which may also be heard in spoken language as on va parler de t’ça. De t’ça sounds like de with a t sound on the end, followed by ça. Ça in de ça and de t’ça rhymes with the words pas and chat in this video.

You might also like:
Say it in French: Translate 125 sentences to conversational Québécois French

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When you think of verbs unique to Québécois French, which ones come to mind?

There are many of course, but here are OffQc’s choices for five typically Québécois French verbs.

1. POGNER

This verb is used in the sense of catching or “landing” something, like the flu (pogner la grippe) or a ticket (pogner un ticket).

Je viens de pogner un ticket parce que je textais à une lumière rouge.

I just got a ticket because I was texting at a red light.

Pronunciation tip:

Pogner is pronounced ponyé.

Keep reading… Everything you ever wanted to know about the Québécois French verb pogner.

2. NIAISER

This verb has different uses, but the most common is probably the one where it’s used in the sense of joking around.

Arrête don’ de niaiser, tes jokes plates me font pas rire.

Stop joking around, your bad jokes aren’t making me laugh.

Pronunciation tip:

Niaiser is pronounced nyèzé.

Keep reading… Everything you ever wanted to know about the Québécois French verb niaiser.

3. TRIPPER

When you “trip” in Québécois, you’re really into something or having a great time. It comes from English drug slang.

Ma job me fait tripper!

I totally love my job!

Usage tips:

Learn the expression tripper sur. Je trippe fort sur la soie dentaire. I totally love dental floss.

Use dessus when what you love is not stated because it’s understood. Je trippe fort dessus. I totally love it.

This verb is also spelled triper. Take your pick!

4. CAPOTER

The root of the verb capoter contains cap, which refers to the head. Quand tu capotes, that’s exactly what you lose — your head.

Hey man, capote pas, c’est pas grave.

Hey man, don’t lose it, it’s not a big deal.

5. ÉCOEURER

You can tell a friend (or non-friend!) to stop teasing or picking on you with the verb écoeurer. Depending on the context, écoeurer quelqu’un can mean “to pick on someone, to poke fun at someone, to tease someone, to take a dig at someone…”

Arrête de m’écoeurer avec ça.

Stop teasing me about that. Stop picking on me about that.

Pronunciation tip:

Écoeurer is pronounced ékeuré.

Keep reading… The related adjective écoeurant has both a negative and positive sense in Québécois French.

Got any verbs to add to this list?
Let me know in the comments.

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A good expression to learn is arrête donc de. With this expression, you can tell people to stop doing whatever it is that’s bothering you.

Google is our friend again. I typed arrête donc de to find 10 things that people want others to stop doing.

Donc is pronounced don here. I’ll use the spelling don’ to help you remember.

I’ve translated arrête don’ de in the examples as “stop (doing whatever)” and “stop (doing whatever), will you.”

Arrête don’ de chiâler contre les chiâleux.
Stop complaining about people who complain.

T’aimes pas ça te faire gosser?
Ben arrête don’ de gosser les autres.
You don’t like to be bugged?
Well stop bugging others then.

Arrête don’ de faire ta moumoune.
Stop acting like a sissy, will you.

Arrête don’ de capoter pour rien.
Stop freaking out for nothing.

Arrête don’ de dire des niaiseries.
Stop saying such stupid things, will you.
Stop talking nonsense, will you.

Arrête don’ de blâmer les joueurs.
Stop blaming the players.

Arrête don’ de péter d’la broue.
Stop showing off. (Péter sounds like pèté.)

Don’t forget the form arrêtez donc de, of course. This one can be used when speaking to more than one person.

Arrêtez don’ de bitcher sur les posts des autres!
Stop bitching on other people’s posts!

Arrêtez don’ de niaiser, c’est sérieux tout ça.
Stop messing around, this is serious stuff.

Arrêtez don’ de chercher des bibittes partout!
Stop finding fault with everything!
Stop looking for problems everywhere!

I’ll end with this note about the word une bibitte: it means “bug” (insect). So the last example literally means “stop looking for bugs everywhere.” This word is also said as une bébitte. We’ll look more closely at how this word is used in another entry.

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ma-vie-cest-de-la-marde-francais-quebecois

Ma vie, c’est d’la marde.

Ma vie, c’est d’la marde.
My life is shitty.
[His life is shitty because he got D+ at school. Well, at least he got the +.]

Stresse pas, bro!
La vie est si belle!
Don’t stress out, bro!
Life is so nice!

C’est vrai, au moins il fait beau en esti!
That’s true, at least it’s fuckin’ nice out!

Hehe, j’niaisais!
Hehe, I was kidding!

_ _ _

[…] en esti, fucking […]
c’est beau en esti!, that’s fucking nice!
t’es hot en esti!, you’re fucking hot!

niaiser, to kid, to joke
arrête de niaiser!, stop kidding around!
me niaises-tu?, are you kidding me?

+ 13 example sentences of the québécois marde here.

Bon lundi!

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