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Posts Tagged ‘pogner’

Here’s some more overheard French today. Everything below was heard in Montréal.

Y’a eu un accrochage.

There’s been an accident.

This is what someone said when two cars bumped into each other. Un accrochage is a small accident, a fender-bender.

Il y a eu was pronounced informally as y’a eu.

— Ça va, toi?
— Oui, toi?

— How are you?
— Good, and you?

— You doing good?
— Yeah, and you?

When you ask someone ça va?, the answer will usually be oui, toi?

Ça va? is a yes-no question (unlike comment ça va?); that’s why you can answer with oui.

Y’est pogné là-d’dans.

He’s caught up in it.

If you’re caught up or stuck in a certain situation, you might say informally that you’re pogné là-dedans.

The gné ending of pogné sounds like nyé. Pogné sounds like ponnyé, or [pɔɲe] in IPA. There are lots of examples of pogner in the latest OffQc guide 1000.

Il est was pronounced informally as y’est, which sounds like yé. You can understand là-dedans (pronounced here without the second syllable) as meaning in it.

Fa’ que c’est c’que j’ai faite.

So that’s what I did.

So is very often said as faque. It might be pronounced with one syllable as fak, or with two as fa-que. The speaker of this example pronounced it with two syllables.

C’que is a contraction of ce que. It sounds like skeu.

The past participle fait was pronounced as faite, with the final t. (It sounds like fètt.) This is a feature of informal language.

C’est là où on en est.

That’s where things stand (for us). That’s where we’re at. That’s where we’ve ended up.

Remember, because of the liaison, on en est is pronounced on n’en n’é.

Ça fait super mal.

It hurts so much.

The person who said this emphasised how much it hurt by using the word super. This is an informal usage.

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Just some random stuff to learn or review today…

1. Tant qu’à moi, c’est pas nécessaire.
In my opinion, it’s not necessary. Tant qu’à moi is often used in conversations in the same sense as quant à moi.

2. Tu parlais pas mal fort.
You were speaking pretty loud. Fort means loud when talking about volume. Pas mal is an intensifier.

3. J’en aurais pour la soirée à faire ça.
It would take me all evening to do that. J’en ai pour means it will take me when talking about time. J’en ai pour deux minutes. I’ll be two minutes. It’ll take me two minutes.

4. Y’est cheap en crisse.
He’s so damn cheap. Cheap can be used to call someone stingy. En crisse is a vulgar intensifier, like en estie and en tabarnak from #930. Crisse sounds much like the English name Chris, but with a French r. Y’est sounds like yé. It’s an informal pronunciation of il est.

5. Je fais ça aux trois semaines.
I do that every three weeks. Aux trois semaines means every three weeks. Similarly, aux trois jours, aux deux mois, etc.

6. Tu vas te faire pogner.
You’re going to get caught. The informal pogner means to catch, grab, nab, etc., so se faire pogner means to get caught. Remember, the g in pogner isn’t pronounced like a hard g. Pogner sounds like ponnyé.

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On Urbania, Donavan Lauzon lists his top 10 signs you’ve failed Valentine’s Day.

Number 9?

Tu t’es fait domper au mois de février.

You got dumped in the month of February.

Domper is an informal usage. It comes from the English dump.

But se faire domper isn’t the only way he says to get dumped in his post. He also uses the swear word crisser in the expression se faire crisser là.

[…] tu te fais crisser là, la semaine ou la journée même de la St-Valentin.

Maybe that expression will remind you of Lisa LeBlanc’s song Câlisse-moi là. Câlisser is a swear word. Câlisse-moi là is a rude way of saying dump me. If you follow that link, you’ll find another example of this: Maude Schiltz in Ah shit, j’ai pogné le cancer says she’s dumping a health professional at the hospital where she’s receiving treatment because she’s lost all faith in him. She says:

C’est fini, je le câlisse là.

Crisser and câlisser are often used when talking about getting rid of things (and people!). Crisser quelqu’un dehors and câlisser quelqu’un dehors both mean to kick someone the hell/fuck out. But when the sense is one of dumping or ditching someone, instead of dehors it’s là.

Tu te fais crisser là.
Je le câlisse là.
Câlisse-moi là, etc.

The author goes on to explain that getting dumped on or around Valentine’s Day is bad timing:

Être en break-up à cette période de l’année, c’est comme pogner une érection en public : vraiment pas un timing optimal.

Being broken up this time of the year [around Valentine’s Day] is like getting an erection in public: really not the best timing.

Broadly speaking, pogner means to catch. So pogner une érection means to “catch” an erection, in other words, to get an erection.

se faire domper
se faire crisser là
crisser quelqu’un dehors
pogner une érection

_ _ _

Donavan Lauzon, Le Registre : les 10 signes que tu échoues ta St-Valentin, Urbania, 12 February 2015.

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On Urbania, Kéven Breton writes about the challenge of getting into different bars in Montréal on his wheelchair, in Vie nocturne à roulettes : tous ces bars qui ne veulent pas de moi.

He says some bars pass the test, and others don’t.

And then there are the bars in between… a sort of fake kind of accessible, as in:

Ah ouais c’est accessible chenous monsieur! Vous avez juste à passer par l’arrière, dans la petite ruelle qui pue le cadavre. Y’a une petite porte en métal, à côté des vidanges. Cognez, on va aller vous ouvrir! Pis rendu là, y’a juste deux petites marches!

Yeah sure, we’re accessible here, sir! You just have to go around the back into the alley that smells like a dead body. There’s a small metal door beside the garbage. Knock and we’ll let you in! Then after that, there are only two small steps!

We first looked at Kéven’s use of chenous (chez nous) in #861. Maybe you’ll remember that chez nous can mean “at my place” in Québec, just like chez moi. For example, a person who lives alone might say chez nous to talk about his place, instead of chez moi. And even if you live alone, he might say chez vous to talk about your place, instead of chez toi.

In the example above, we really can understand chez nous to refer to more than one person though. Chez nous here (or chenous) refers to the bar and its employees.

Kéven also used vidanges in his text: à côté des vidanges, or “next to the garbage.” Elsewhere on OffQc, we’ve see the term un sac à vidanges, which is a garbage bag.

Learn the verb cogner! Every learner of French learns to say frapper à la porte for “knock on the door,” but have you learned cogner à la porte too? You need to!

You’ll hear the Québécois use the adjective rendu a lot too. We won’t look at all the uses of rendu here, just the one in the example above. Broadly speaking, rendu means “arrived” or “become.” Using “arrived,” we can say that rendu là means “arrived there” — or in more natural-sounding English: “at that point.”

Finally, the word cadavre… This word can be added to the list of 50 words pronounced with the â sound in Québec but not spelled with the accented â. That’s because cadavre is pronounced cadâvre. Only the second a is pronounced â, not the first one. You can hear it pronounced on this Wiki page, near the bottom.

Kéven also wrote y’a a couple times instead of il y a. If you listen to a lot of spoken French, you know that the most normal way of pronouncing il y a during regular conversations is certainly y’a. The negative form is y’a pas.

You can continue reading Kéven’s text on your own, discover more vocabulary and understand how Kéven feels about accessibility in Montréal bars. (You’ll also find an example of pogner in there, when Kéven says pogner le métro, or grab the métro.)

Summary

chez nous can mean chez moi
chez vous can mean chez toi
à côté des vidanges, beside the garbage
un sac à vidanges, a garbage bag
cognez!, knock!
cogner à la porte, to knock at the door
pis rendu là, then at that point, then after that
cadavre is pronounced cadâvre
y’a is an informal pronunciation of il y a
pogner le métro,
to grab the métro

P.S. Pogner and cogner rhyme. Be sure not to pronounce the g in these words. They sound like ponnyé and connyé.

_ _ _

Quote by Kéven Breton in Vie nocturne : tous ces bars qui ne veulent pas de moi, on Urbania, 7 October 2014.

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I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again (and again) — we can never have too many examples of the Québécois French verb pogner on OffQc!

It’s the one verb I’m consistently asked for help with.

In this post, I’ve taken a good number of the examples of pogner from this Wiktionnaire article and translated them into English.

The basic idea behind the verb pogner is “to grab” or “to catch.” For my readers who speak Spanish, the basic idea behind the verb pogner is “agarrar.”

Remember, pogner is an informal usage. It’s fine to use it during conversations with friends, but not in formal language.

Sauve-toi, il va te pogner!
Make a run for it, he’s gonna catch you!

J’ai pogné un rhume.
I caught a cold.

Elle m’a pogné par la manche.
She grabbed me by the sleeve.

L’envie m’a pogné de l’embrasser.
I had an urge to kiss him/her (lit., desire to kiss him/her grabbed me).

Tu as bien fait d’intervenir parce que les nerfs étaient en train de me pogner.
You did the right thing by interrupting because I was losing my temper (lit., my nerves were grabbing me).

Tip: nerfs is pronounced ner.

Voyons, qu’est-ce qui te pogne tout d’un coup?
Jeez, what’s the matter with you all of a sudden (lit., what’s grabbing you all of a sudden)?

Il s’est fait pogner par son patron.
He got caught by his boss.

Je roulais à une vitesse normale, mais j’ai pogné une bosse et je ne m’y attendais pas.
I was driving along at normal speed, but then I hit a bump and I wasn’t expecting it (lit., I caught a bump and I wasn’t expecting it).

Il a pogné trois ans de prison.
He got three years in jail (lit., he caught three years in jail).

La pognes-tu?
Do you get it (lit., do you catch it)?
(la = la blague, la joke)

J’la pogne pas.
I don’t get it (lit., I don’t catch it).
(la = la blague, la joke)

Sa musique pogne pas.
His music isn’t a hit (lit., his music doesn’t catch on).

Notre site internet pogne de plus en plus.
Our website is getting more and more popular (lit., our website is catching on more and more).

J’ai beau aller dans les bars, je pogne pas pantoute.
Even though I go to bars, I never meet anybody at all (lit., I never catch on).

Il pogne pas avec les filles.
He’s not lucky with girls (lit., he doesn’t catch on).

Do you see how the idea behind all of these examples is “grab” or “catch”? It’s the basic idea in the examples that follow too, but I won’t keep including it in the translation.

Le party a pogné à partir de ce moment-là.
That’s when the party really got underway.

C’est tellement bon cet album-là, je vais m’en pogner un, c’est sûr!
That album is so good, I’m going to get a copy of it for sure!

Il s’est pogné le doigt dans la machine.
He got his finger stuck in the machine.

J’ai peur de me pogner les cheveux dans le filtreur de la piscine.
I’m scared to get my hair caught in the pool filter.

Depuis deux semaines, ma sœur passe ses soirées à se pogner avec son amoureux.
For the past two weeks, my sister’s been making out with her boyfriend every evening.

Ils se sont pognés aux cheveux.
They had a go at one another, they argued.

C’est la troisième fois qu’il se pogne avec le prof cette semaine.
It’s the third time he’s argued with the prof this week.

Quand on se pogne avec quelqu’un à tout bout de champ, je pense que c’est mieux de prendre ses distances.
When all you do is argue with someone non-stop, I think it’s better to distance yourself.

Il s’est pogné avec un gars qui cherchait toujours à le dépasser sur la route. C’est comme ça qu’il a fait son accident.
He had a go (argued) with a guy who kept trying to overtake him on the road. That’s how he caused his accident.

So, have you managed to pogner the meaning of this verb yet? Can you answer number 5 in this list of 10 signs you speak French like the Québécois?

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When you think of verbs unique to Québécois French, which ones come to mind?

There are many of course, but here are OffQc’s choices for five typically Québécois French verbs.

1. POGNER

This verb is used in the sense of catching or “landing” something, like the flu (pogner la grippe) or a ticket (pogner un ticket).

Je viens de pogner un ticket parce que je textais à une lumière rouge.

I just got a ticket because I was texting at a red light.

Pronunciation tip:

Pogner is pronounced ponyé.

Keep reading… Everything you ever wanted to know about the Québécois French verb pogner.

2. NIAISER

This verb has different uses, but the most common is probably the one where it’s used in the sense of joking around.

Arrête don’ de niaiser, tes jokes plates me font pas rire.

Stop joking around, your bad jokes aren’t making me laugh.

Pronunciation tip:

Niaiser is pronounced nyèzé.

Keep reading… Everything you ever wanted to know about the Québécois French verb niaiser.

3. TRIPPER

When you “trip” in Québécois, you’re really into something or having a great time. It comes from English drug slang.

Ma job me fait tripper!

I totally love my job!

Usage tips:

Learn the expression tripper sur. Je trippe fort sur la soie dentaire. I totally love dental floss.

Use dessus when what you love is not stated because it’s understood. Je trippe fort dessus. I totally love it.

This verb is also spelled triper. Take your pick!

4. CAPOTER

The root of the verb capoter contains cap, which refers to the head. Quand tu capotes, that’s exactly what you lose — your head.

Hey man, capote pas, c’est pas grave.

Hey man, don’t lose it, it’s not a big deal.

5. ÉCOEURER

You can tell a friend (or non-friend!) to stop teasing or picking on you with the verb écoeurer. Depending on the context, écoeurer quelqu’un can mean “to pick on someone, to poke fun at someone, to tease someone, to take a dig at someone…”

Arrête de m’écoeurer avec ça.

Stop teasing me about that. Stop picking on me about that.

Pronunciation tip:

Écoeurer is pronounced ékeuré.

Keep reading… The related adjective écoeurant has both a negative and positive sense in Québécois French.

Got any verbs to add to this list?
Let me know in the comments.

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C'est sûr que tu vas pogner un ticket.

C’est sûr que tu vas pogner un ticket.

I’m of the opinion that we can never have enough examples of the informal verb pogner on OffQc. So here are five more!

Remember, the sense behind pogner is one of catching, grabbing or getting a hold of something.

I came across this comment left by a female on another female’s new Facebook profile image:

Ah ben maudit, j’viens de pogner une érection.
Ah well damn, I just got an erection.

I then typed je viens de pogner in Google to find out what other things people have just recently got, other than erections. Here’s what I found in the results:

Je viens de pogner un ticket parce que je textais à une lumière rouge et vous savez quoi? Tant mieux pour moi car criss de mauvaise habitude.
I just got a ticket because I was texting at a red light and you know what? Serves me right because (it’s a) fuckin’ bad habit.

The t in ticket is pronounced. Remember, a traffic light is known as both une lumière and un feu in Québec. Lumière is an informal usage in the sense of traffic light.

This commenter just got a new car and had this to say:

Je viens de pogner le meilleur deal de ma vie.
I just got the best deal of my life.

This person got a cramp in his calf:

Je viens de pogner une crampe au mollet gauche. Je pensais mourir, osti!
I just got a cramp in my left calf. I thought I was gonna die, dammit!

More health issues…

Quelqu’un a des Tylénol ou des Advil extra fort? Je viens de pogner un méchant mal de tête.
Anybody got extra strength Tylenol or Advil? I just got a wicked headache.

So there you go — five new examples to add to your growing knowledge of the verb pogner:

  • pogner une érection
  • pogner un ticket
  • pogner un deal
  • pogner une crampe
  • pogner un mal de tête

Image credit: Le Devoir

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