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Posts Tagged ‘prendre une marche’

In #922, the expression prendre une marche came up, which is a calque of the English expression to take a walk.

A reader asked what expressions could be used in place of prendre une marche. It’s good to know other ways of saying it because in some circumstances, like in a composition in your French course, it might be best to use a different wording.

(This doesn’t mean I consider prendre une marche to be incorrect, of course — but some people do, and it’s good to be aware of that so you can choose when and if you’ll use the expression.)

I consulted the Usito dictionary, and here are other possibilities they suggest:

aller marcher
faire une marche
faire une promenade
faire un tour
se promener

The Banque de dépannage linguistique also suggests other ways here, including:

faire une promenade
faire une marche
faire un tour
faire un tour à pied
se promener
marcher
aller marcher

I take issue with the way they label the examples using prendre une marche as exemples fautifs (and then also put them in red!), but you might still find the page useful for different examples of usage.

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1. In the last entry, we saw how je suis en can contract to j’t’en, where j’ makes a ch sound (ch’t’en).

We’ve seen je suis reduced to just a ch sound before in Lisa LeBlanc’s song J’pas un cowboy (official video on YouTube here). J’pas is a contraction of je (ne) suis pas, and it sounds like ch’pas.

2. In a radio ad, I heard a woman say prendre une marche avec mon chum, to take a walk with my boyfriend.

The expression prendre une marche is a calque of the English expression to take a walk (and felt to be incorrect by certain people for that reason).

3. Parle-moi can be negated informally as parle-moi pas. Parle-moi pas comme ça. Don’t talk to me like that.

The same goes for dis-moi ça (dis-moi pas ça), demande-moi (demande-moi pas), dérange-moi (dérange-moi pas), etc.

4. Learn the phrase on peut-tu…? It means can we…?, is it possible to…? The tu here signals that this is a yes-no question. On peut-tu aller le voir? Can we go see him, it? On peut-tu arrêter de chiâler? Can we stop complaining?

5. OK, not Québécois French, but still of interest — Montréal’s got a street name change in the city centre, boulevard Robert-Bourassa.

If you’re new to OffQc, check out C’est what? 75 mini lessons in conversational Québécois French for an overview of important features of spoken language. (You can buy and download it here immediately.)

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