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Posts Tagged ‘public transport’

Accent québécoisI took this photo in métro Jean-Talon.

It’s got dzidzu-tsitsu written all over it…

Sortie is pronounced sor-tsi.

Côte-Vertu is pronounced côt-ver-tsu.

Direction is pronounced dzi-rek-sion.

It’s got tsi, tsu and dzi — but not dzu.

For dzu, I should have travelled to métro Dzu Collège!

Du Collège

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On an STM bus, a young man said on débarque ici to a friend sitting beside him, or “let’s get off here.”

A friend offered me a diet Pepsi to drink, un Pepsi diète.

The Pepsi was in a can, en canette.

A doctor that I won’t be seeing anymore had his receptionist call me. She said je ferme votre dossier, or “I’m closing your file.”

A sign at a fast food restaurant said veuillez faire la ligne ici, or “please line up here.”

Two friends wished each other a happy noon lunch break by saying bon midi! and bon lunch! to each other.

I saw a sign in shopping centre that said bon magasinage!, or “happy shopping!”

A Latin American tourist asked her husband what on signs outside buildings in Montréal could possibly mean. It’s the equivalent of a one-bedroom apartment available for rent.

Signs that read logement à louer mean that there’s an apartment available for rent.

The words diète and midi from above are dzidzu words. Diète is pronounced dziète and midi is pronounced midzi.

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Remember this ad aimed at people with drug addictions?

Tanné d’être gelé?
Had it with being stoned?
Sick of being stoned?

Literally, gelé means frozen.

That sums up how someone who’s stoned looks.

Tanné means fed up. So, je suis tanné (which you can also hear pronounced informally as chu tanné or chui tanné), means “I’m fed up” or “I’ve had it.”

Tanné d'être gelé?I saw a new version of the ad the other day.

Now that it’s summer, the ad reads like this:

Tanné d’être gelé?
même l’été

It’s a play on words:

Had it with being frozen (i.e., stoned), even in the summer?

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Débarre ta villeIn the last post about how to talk about locking up your bike in French, we saw the verb barrer.

I was reminded of this verb’s opposite earlier today on the métro, when I spotted a free newspaper sitting on a seat.

The front page reads:

Débarre ta ville
Unlock your city

If you can lock things up with barrer, then you can unlock them with débarrer, like:

débarrer un cadenas
to open a lock

débarrer une porte
to unlock a door

Débarre ta ville is a treasure hunt from the STM.

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Métro, boulot, dodo…

This French expression refers to the humdrum of everyday life.

You take the métro in the morning to go to your boulot (work), go home after work to go dodo (to sleep), then wake up the next morning and do it all again.

Boulot is an informal word for work. Dodo is a word used by children (and their parents!) meaning sleep or bedtime.

The STM is displaying an ad to promote an illimited weekend pass to use public transport. With the pass, it’s not métro, boulot, dodo but…

bus, stade, hot-dog, métro, concert, pub, dodo, bagel, bus, musée, smoked meat, métro, planétarium, métro, terrasse, dimsum, métro, la Ronde, barbe à papa, bus, bar, poutine, bus, dodo, brunch, métro, tam-tams, magasinage, bus, calèche, plage, métro, sushi, casino, bus, dodo!

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Tanné d'être gelé?

This ad seen in métro Atwater asks:

Tanné d’être gelé?
Had it with being stoned?

The ad is aimed at people with drug, alcohol and gambling addictions.

être tanné de
to be fed up with

gelé
stoned, drugged

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