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Posts Tagged ‘quart de livre’

In #1015, you saw how to order at Tim Hortons in French when in Québec.

Then you saw some random bits of McDonalds vocab in the posts following that one; let’s build on that now to create a more complete post here about how to order at McDonalds in French when in Québec.

Same concept as the Tim Hortons post — mock exchanges with a cashier typical of what you might hear in a McDonalds in Québec. The prices are made up.

— Passez ici, s’il vous plaît!
— Bonjour, je vais prendre le trio Big Mac.
— C’est pour manger ici?
— Non, c’est pour emporter.
— Neuf et dix, s’il vous plaît.

— Next, please!
— Hi, I’ll take the Big Mac combo (meal), please.
— Is it for here?
— No, it’s to go.
— Nine ten, please.

— Passez ici!
— Bonjour, ça va être le filet de poisson.
— Voulez-vous le trio?
— Non, merci.
— Ça va être tout?
— Oui.
— Quatre dollars.

— Next!
— Hi, I’ll take a filet-o-fish.
— Do you want the combo?
— No, thanks.
— Will that be all?
— Yes.
— Four dollars.

— Suivant!
— Bonjour, je vais prendre un cheese* pis une petite frite.
— C’est pour ici ou pour emporter?
— Pour emporter.
— Ça fait quatre et cinquante.

— Next!
— Hi, I’ll take a cheeseburger and small fries.
— Is it for here or to go?
— To go.
— That’ll be four fifty.

— Bienvenue chez McDonalds!
— Bonjour, je vais prendre un cornet.
— Autre chose?
— Oui, un sundae au caramel.
— Ensuite?
— Un McFlurry Oreo.
— Quel format?
— Collation.*
— Autre chose?
— Oui, le trio Quart de livre avec fromage.
— Quel breuvage?
— Un coke. Ah, pis je vais prendre un Joyeux festin Poulet McCroquettes, pis le trio CBO* deux fois.
— Ensuite?
— C’est tout.
— C’est pour emporter?
— C’est pour manger ici!
— Quarante dollars. (…) Bon appétit!
— Merci. (…) Ah, je vais juste vous demander du ketchup, s’il vous plaît.
— C’est juste là-bas, à côté des breuvages.
— Parfait, merci.
— Bonne journée.

— Welcome to McDonalds!
— Hi, I’ll take an ice cream cone.
— Anything else?
— Yes, a caramel sundae.
— Next?
— An Oreo McFlurry.
— What size?
— Snack size.*
— Anything else?
— Yes, the Quarter pounder with cheese combo.
— What drink?
— A coke. Oh, and I’ll also take a Chicken McNuggets Happy Meal, and two CBO combos.
— Next?
— That’s it.
— Is it to go?
— It’s for here!
— Forty dollars. (…) Bon appétit!
— Thanks. (…) Oh, can I just get some ketchup, please?
— It’s just over there, next to the drinks.
— Perfect, thanks.
— Have a good day.

*You can also say cheeseburger, of course. CBO is pronounced cé-bé-ô. The small McFlurry size is called collation; the large McFlurry size is called classique.

 

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You know those sponsored ads that show up in your Facebook feed (do I even need to ask)? I’ve pulled seven comments left on those ads by other people for us to look at. Might as well turn those ads into something we can learn from.

I haven’t changed any of the words; the only changes I’ve made are to spelling and punctuation, or I may have included only part of a comment if it was long.

1. On an ad from Zoosk, an online dating site, we find this comment:

C’est d’la marde, ça.
This is shit. It’s garbage.

You’ll hear shit called marde very frequently in Québec!

If it’s crap, c’est d’la marde.

2. On an ad for a 5 km run from Color Vibe, held in different countries around the world, a Facebook user who wanted to participate named a friend in a comment and asked her:

T’es-tu down?
You down? You game?
Do you wanna go?
Do you wanna do this?

We’ve seen in other posts on OffQc that down can be used in the sense of feeling down (depressed). Chu down depuis hier, I’ve been (feeling) down since yesterday. Y’a pogné un down, he’s (feeling) down.

In this Facebook example, down means “to be willing” or “to be up for it” or, like the other informal québécois word that’s been coming up on OffQc lately, game.

T’es-tu game? T’es-tu down?
T’es-tu down pour demain?

This question uses the informal yes-no tu in it. The part that means “you” in this question is the t’. The tu is the part that signals to us that it’s a yes-no question.

3. Then there was this comment on an ad from CarrXpert promoting their body shop repairs:

Fini CarrXpert pour moi, une belle job de cochon sur mon auto.
Never again CarrXpert for me, (they) messed up my car good.

The word job in Québécois French is usually a feminine word in colloquial conversations. Job can refer to employment (for example: j’ai lâché ma job, I quit my job), but not in this example: here, it’s used in the sense of work that was carried out on a car.

4. On an ad from Keurig (they make single-serving coffee brewers that use small disposable cups), a commenter points out the negative effects of their coffee brewer on the environment:

Bravo pour faire plus de déchets! Je préfère ma vieille machine et composter ma mouture sans déchets! Gang de paresseux!
Bravo for making more waste! I prefer my old machine and composting my grounds without making waste! Bunch of lazy people!

The French word gang as used in Québec sounds much like its English equivalent. It’s a feminine noun. It can mean “gang” just like in English (like a street gang), but it’s even more often used in the general sense of a bunch of people — nothing to do with crime.

Ma gang de bureau, my friends from the office, my office group. Gang de caves! Bunch of idiots! Toute la gang est invitée, the whole gang is invited, all you guys are invited.

C'est du pink slime.

C’est du pink slime.

5. In a McDonald’s ad for the quart de livre (quarter pounder) showing an image of a horribly pink, uncooked hamburger patty being weighed on scale (to prove it really does weigh a quarter pound), we find this comment:

Quart de livre de marde rose et blanche.
Quarter pound of pink and white shit.

There’s that marde again!

6. Then there was also this comment on the same McDonald’s ad:

C’est dégueu. T’as-tu vu la couleur?
That’s disgusting. Did you see the colour?

And there’s that informal yes-no question marker again too. The part that means “you” in this question is the t’. The tu signals that it’s a yes-no question.

Dégueu is a short form of dégueulasse.

7. And this comment, again on the same McDonald’s ad:

Moi, du McDo, c’est pas mal fini.
For me, (eating) McDonald’s, it’s pretty much over.

Pas mal is an expression meaning “pretty” or “pretty much.” C’est pas mal cher. It’s pretty expensive. Y’est pas mal cute, lui. He’s pretty cute. J’ai pas mal de livres dans ma chambre. I’ve got quite a few book in my room.

Don’t pause between pas and mal. Say those two words together because they form an expression: c’est / pas mal / cher.

_ _ _

1. C’est d’la marde, ça.

2. T’es-tu down?

3. Fini CarrXpert pour moi, une belle job de cochon sur mon auto.

4. Bravo pour faire plus de déchets! Je préfère ma vieille machine et composter ma mouture sans déchets! Gang de paresseux!

5. Quart de livre de marde rose et blanche.

6. C’est dégueu. T’as-tu vu la couleur?

7. Moi, du McDo, c’est pas mal fini.

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