Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘rendu’

A reader asks how rendu is used. There are different ways, but let’s just look here at what it means in the question y’est rendu où?

Rendu is the past participle of the verb rendre. Here, we can understand rendu to mean gone to, ended up.

In an article on Urbania called Kicker Bruce Lee dans les chnolles (“Kick Bruce Lee in the nuts” — chnolles is your bonus word today), Jonathan Roberge writes:

« Y’est rendu où le gars positif que j’étais!? Est-ce que c’est ça vieillir ? Genre, je deviens un vieux grincheux jamais content? Oh, non! Je suis devenu un adulte, c’est ça!! »

“What ever happened to the positive guy I used to be!? Is that what getting old is about? Like, I become an old grump who’s never happy? Oh, no — I’ve become an adult, that’s what it is!!”

Y’est rendu où is used in his text in the sense of what ever happened to him, where did he go, where did he end up. Y’est is a contraction of il est, and it sounds like yé. Gars rhymes with pas (rs not pronounced).

y’est rendu où?
where did it/he go?
what ever happened to it/him?

genre
like, as in

un vieux grincheux
an old grump
a grumpy old man

kicker
to kick

les chnolles
balls, nuts

Quote by Jonathan Roberge, “Kicker Bruce Lee dans les chnolles,” Urbania, 19 December 2014.

Read Full Post »

Here’s another ad spotted in Montréal. You can click on it.

The ad itself doesn’t matter; it’s just the last sentence that’s interesting because it contains a word I often get asked about: rendu.

T’es presque rendu là.
You’ve almost arrived.
You’re almost there.

(The ad was placed near the Salon de l’auto de Montréal where we can actually see the car. That’s why it’s telling us we’re almost there.)

In this sense, rendu means “arrived.” It’s the past participle of the verb rendre.

In a previous entry, we saw another example of where rendu meant “arrived.”

Il était à 3000 fans sur sa page Facebook, mais là il est rendu à 4000.
He was at 3000 fans on his Facebook page, but now he’s [arrived] at 4000.

That last example also includes là, another word that raises a lot of questions in the minds of learners of French! It just means “now” here.

If you remember the dzidzu (d sounds like dz before the i and u sounds), then you know that rendu sounds like rendzu when pronounced aloud.

Read Full Post »

Yesterday in #864, we saw the expression c’est rendu que, which means “it’s to the point where” or “it’s got to the point where.” You can go back and read the examples there using c’est rendu que if you want to review.

Let’s continue with rendu here.

In the examples below (found through Google), the second sentence in French uses a more colloquial pronunciation.

You might hear rendu used in the sense of “become.” For example, you might hear it used to talk about new jobs where the person “becomes” something new, like a police officer, professor, etc.

Il est rendu policier.
Yé rendu policier.

He’s become a policeman.

J’ai un cousin qui a chauffé 10 ans pour Laidlaw mais il est rendu policier.
J’ai un cousin qui a chauffé 10 ans pour Laidlaw mais yé rendu policier.

I have a cousin who drove for Laidlaw for 10 years but he’s become a policeman.

Chauffer is used in Québec in the same sense as conduire, which is also used.

Le pire c’est qu’il est rendu professeur de français.
Le pire c’est qu’yé rendu professeur de français.
The worst part is that he’s become a French professor.

Other times, rendu feels more like “arrived.”

Il était à 3000 fans sur sa page Facebook, mais là il est rendu à 4000.
Y’était à 3000 fans sur sa page Facebook, mais là yé rendu à 4000.

He was at 3000 fans on his Facebook page, but now he’s at 4000.

Il y a trois ans, on a parti ça pour le fun et là, on est rendu à un millier de participants.
Y’a trois ans, on a parti ça pour le fun et là, on est rendu à un millier de participants.
Three years ago, we started this just for fun, and now we’re at a thousand participants.

We can look at more uses of rendu in upcoming posts if more usages come to my mind this weekend! 😉

Read Full Post »

In #863, we found the adjective rendu in a text written by Kéven Breton about wheelchair accessibility. The wording was:

Ah ouais c’est accessible chenous monsieur! Vous avez juste à passer par l’arrière, dans la petite ruelle qui pue le cadavre. Y’a une petite porte en métal, à côté des vidanges. Cognez, on va aller vous ouvrir! Pis rendu là, y’a juste deux petites marches!

Yeah sure, we’re accessible here, sir! You just have to go around the back into the alley that smells like a dead body. There’s a small metal door beside the garbage. Knock, and we’ll let you in! Then after that (at that point), there are only two small steps!

[Kéven Breton, Vie nocturne : tous ces bars qui ne veulent pas de moi, Urbania, 7 octobre 2014.]

Maybe you’ve been hearing the adjective rendu a lot as you listen to francophones from Québec speak, which wouldn’t be surprising because it’s used frequently.

There’s an expression in particular using rendu that we can look at: c’est rendu que. In the examples below (all found online somewhere), we can say that c’est rendu que means “it’s to the point where.”

Mais là, c’est rendu qu’il fait 3-4 parfois 5 cacas par jour.
But now it’s to the point where he’s going poo 3-4 sometimes 5 times a day.

Là, c’est rendu que j’ose même plus regarder mon père dans les yeux.
Now it’s to the point where I don’t even dare look at my father in the eyes.

Là, c’est rendu que je me fais réveiller de deux à quatre fois par semaine par des gens qui font sauter des feux d’artifice.
Now it’s to the point where I’m woken up two to four times a week by people setting off firecrackers.

Interestingly, those three examples above began with là, which means “now.” This helps to insist on the change in the situation. Not all sentences using c’est rendu que begin with though. Here are a few last examples:

C’est rendu que je me mets toujours à douter de moi.
It’s to the point where I always start doubting myself.

C’est rendu que je n’aime plus sortir avec mon chum.
It’s to the point where I don’t like going out with my boyfriend anymore.

C’est comme une drogue les Olympiques. C’est rendu que je regarde les reprises des reprises!
The Olympics are like a drug, to the point where I watch reruns of reruns!

As you listen to French, see if you can catch examples of  used in the same way as in the examples above. is very frequently used in the sense of “now.”

Là, c’est rendu que…
Pis là, c’est rendu que…
Mais là, c’est rendu que…

Read Full Post »

On Urbania, Kéven Breton writes about the challenge of getting into different bars in Montréal on his wheelchair, in Vie nocturne à roulettes : tous ces bars qui ne veulent pas de moi.

He says some bars pass the test, and others don’t.

And then there are the bars in between… a sort of fake kind of accessible, as in:

Ah ouais c’est accessible chenous monsieur! Vous avez juste à passer par l’arrière, dans la petite ruelle qui pue le cadavre. Y’a une petite porte en métal, à côté des vidanges. Cognez, on va aller vous ouvrir! Pis rendu là, y’a juste deux petites marches!

Yeah sure, we’re accessible here, sir! You just have to go around the back into the alley that smells like a dead body. There’s a small metal door beside the garbage. Knock and we’ll let you in! Then after that, there are only two small steps!

We first looked at Kéven’s use of chenous (chez nous) in #861. Maybe you’ll remember that chez nous can mean “at my place” in Québec, just like chez moi. For example, a person who lives alone might say chez nous to talk about his place, instead of chez moi. And even if you live alone, he might say chez vous to talk about your place, instead of chez toi.

In the example above, we really can understand chez nous to refer to more than one person though. Chez nous here (or chenous) refers to the bar and its employees.

Kéven also used vidanges in his text: à côté des vidanges, or “next to the garbage.” Elsewhere on OffQc, we’ve see the term un sac à vidanges, which is a garbage bag.

Learn the verb cogner! Every learner of French learns to say frapper à la porte for “knock on the door,” but have you learned cogner à la porte too? You need to!

You’ll hear the Québécois use the adjective rendu a lot too. We won’t look at all the uses of rendu here, just the one in the example above. Broadly speaking, rendu means “arrived” or “become.” Using “arrived,” we can say that rendu là means “arrived there” — or in more natural-sounding English: “at that point.”

Finally, the word cadavre… This word can be added to the list of 50 words pronounced with the â sound in Québec but not spelled with the accented â. That’s because cadavre is pronounced cadâvre. Only the second a is pronounced â, not the first one. You can hear it pronounced on this Wiki page, near the bottom.

Kéven also wrote y’a a couple times instead of il y a. If you listen to a lot of spoken French, you know that the most normal way of pronouncing il y a during regular conversations is certainly y’a. The negative form is y’a pas.

You can continue reading Kéven’s text on your own, discover more vocabulary and understand how Kéven feels about accessibility in Montréal bars. (You’ll also find an example of pogner in there, when Kéven says pogner le métro, or grab the métro.)

Summary

chez nous can mean chez moi
chez vous can mean chez toi
à côté des vidanges, beside the garbage
un sac à vidanges, a garbage bag
cognez!, knock!
cogner à la porte, to knock at the door
pis rendu là, then at that point, then after that
cadavre is pronounced cadâvre
y’a is an informal pronunciation of il y a
pogner le métro,
to grab the métro

P.S. Pogner and cogner rhyme. Be sure not to pronounce the g in these words. They sound like ponnyé and connyé.

_ _ _

Quote by Kéven Breton in Vie nocturne : tous ces bars qui ne veulent pas de moi, on Urbania, 7 October 2014.

Read Full Post »