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Posts Tagged ‘snow’

While listening to the radio, a woman called in to request a song.

The radio host told us the woman had requested the song for her boyfriend who had to work late.

New snow had fallen in Montréal, and her boyfriend had to spend the night snowploughing the streets. The last part of what the host said was:

[…] son chum qui doit passer la gratte jusqu’à trois heures du matin.
[…] her boyfriend who has to snowplough until three o’clock in the morning.

Another example of gratte, this one found online:

Quand la gratte passe… dégage!
When a snowplough comes along… get out of the way! [NRJ Gatineau-Ottawa 104.1]

… to avoid getting buried in snow!

You’ll also hear a snowplough called une charrue. Both gratte and charrue are Québécois words used in colloquial conversations.

Related:

Une souffleuse à neige is a snowblower.

It’s that machine that picks up the snow and sends it flying onto your neighbour’s property. 😉

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In this Facebook update from Carnaval de Québec, we’re told to take advantage of the neige collante (packing snow) to make a bonhomme de neige (snowman):

Mes amis, profitez de cette neige collante pour construire un beau bonhomme de neige.

Neige collante is snow that sticks together when you compact it in your hands.

Neige collante is heavier than fluffy snow. It’s the snow you need to make a snowman.

You’ll also hear packing snow called neige lourde because of its weight. You can injure your back when you shovel it away.

There’s also an informal term for packing snow: neige à bonhomme. It’s “snowman snow” after all!

neige collante
neige lourde
neige à bonhomme
heavy packing snow

un bonhomme de neige
snowman

_ _ _

Bonne année la gang! Thanks for a great year and for continuing to read OffQc. We’ll meet again in the new year.

Feliz año nuevo
Feliz ano novo
Buon anno
سال نو مبارک
Yeni yılınız kutlu olsun
سنة سعيدة
Happy new year

😀

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It surely comes as no surprise to you — Montréal gets a lot of snow in the winter: de la marde blanche (the white shit)!

If you drive a car, you’ll need a shovel, une pelle, to dig yourself out after a snowfall, une bordée de neige.

If you have a driveway, you’ll need to shovel that too, pelleter l’entrée. To pronounce pelleter, say it with two syllables: pelter. You can also say pelleter la neige.

When snow is fresh, it looks clean. But when it begins to melt on the roads, it turns into slush, de la slush (de la sloche).

At street corners in downtown Montréal, you’ll often need to jump across a pool of water.

If you get your feet wet in the slush and water, you’re going to be pretty miserable.

Be sure to choose a good pair of winter boots for walking around in Montréal, choisir une bonne paire de bottes d’hiver.

If you’re new to Montréal, walking on slippery sidewalks requires practice. You’ll need those good boots to avoid breaking your back by falling down on the ice, se péter le dos en pognant une débarque sur la glace!

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This cool video from the magazine Urbania lets us in on some facts about Montréal that may surprise you.

The video is from 2007. Feel free to update any numbers that have changed in the comments if you can.

514, code régional

1 854 442 habitants

492 235 immigrants

7 630 rues

522 km de ruelles

233 mètres, hauteur du mont Royal

179 graffiteurs

Montréal est à
10 379 km de Tokyo
5 897 km de Paris
532 km de New York
32 km de Saint-Amable

Le 4 mars 1971,
48 cm de neige
sont tombés sur
Montréal
en 24 heures.

19 ponts

1 île

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