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Posts Tagged ‘tantôt’

It’s winter, and Natalie and Louis (from the television show Les Parent) exchange text messages about the salt that was *supposed* to have been put down by their son Zak to prevent someone from slipping on the ice and getting hurt…

The text from the image is all typed out below, but you can click on the image for a larger version.

grey: Louis
blue: Natalie

Attention, chérie, c’est glissant dans l’entrée.
Careful, dear, the driveway’s slippery.

C’est réglé. J’ai envoyé Zak mettre du sel tantôt.
It’s been taken care of. I sent Zak to put salt down earlier on.

Wow! T’es sûre qu’il y est allé?
Wow! You sure he did it (you sure he went)?

Ha ha! La confiance règne!
Ha ha! What confidence (confidence prevails)!

Désolé. C’est juste qu’il y a des indices qui mentent pas.
Sorry. It’s just that there are some dead giveaways that he didn’t (some clues that don’t lie).

Comme?
Like?

Moi, effoiré dans l’entrée, le dos barré.
Me, sprawled in the driveway with my back thrown out.

Viens me chercher quand t’auras fini de rire.
Come get me (find me) when you’ve finished laughing.

Usage notes

  • In the winter, we put salt (du sel) on surfaces outside to melt the ice on them and make them safe to walk and drive on
  • tantôt, before, earlier on (e.g., désolé pour tantôt, sorry about earlier on; merci pour tantôt, thanks for earlier on)
  • t’es, contraction of tu es, sounds like
  • effoiré, sprawled (e.g., s’effoirer sur le divan, to crash on the sofa; the oi in effoiré may sound like ; more about effoirer in #900)
  • dos barré, back that’s been thrown out, pulled, injured (literally, locked back; remember that barré is pronounced bârré, where sounds approximately like “baw”)
  • t’auras, contraction of tu auras

This exchange of textos was found here on the Facebook page for Les Parent. There, the page administrator asked:

Avez-vous hâte à l’hiver? 😂
Are you excited for winter?
Are you looking forward to winter?

avoir hâte à
to be looking forward to
to be excited for, etc.

J’ai hâte à lundi!
I can’t wait until Monday!

J’ai hâte à demain.
I’m looking forward to tomorrow.

Non, j’ai pas hâte à l’hiver!
No, I’m not looking forward to winter!

Like barré, hâte also uses the â sound. You can hear â pronounced in this video when Martin Matte says j’me fâche and tasse-toi.

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The Québécois Usito dictionary contains a list of belgicismes (words and expressions used in Belgian French).

We’ve seen before how the names of the three meals of the day are the same in Québécois and Belgian French — le déjeuner (breakfast), le dîner (lunch) and le souper (supper).

I’ve picked 10 more items from the Usito list that can be heard in both Québécois and Belgian French according to the list’s author, Michel Francard.

The use of these words and expressions isn’t necessarily limited to Québécois and Belgian French. They may be heard in other French-speaking areas as well.

1. un banc de neige
a snowbank

2. jouer à la cachette
to play hide-and-seek

3. un camionneur, une camionneuse
a truck driver

4. une sacoche
a purse, handbag

5. à tantôt!
see you in a bit!

6. faire la file
to line up, queue up

7. avant-midi
morning (ex., dans l’avant-midi)

8. ennuyant
boring (ex., une conférence ennuyante)

9. d’abord
then, in that case (ex., vas-y d’abord, go ahead then)

10. goûter
to taste like (ex., ce vin goûte le vinaigre)

In the next post — shared Québécois and Swiss French words.

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At a restaurant, I found a pair of keys at the counter. I picked them up and asked a man beside me if they were his. He said he had in fact seen the keys sitting there on the counter before, but they weren’t his.

He said:

Ah! j’es ai vues tantôt.
Oh, I saw ’em before!

What’s going on in this sentence?

First, here’s what it sounds like: jé zé vu tan tô.

What happened here is les got shortened to ‘es. It lost its first letter. It’s not so strange; that happens in English too: “I saw ’em.”

les = them
‘es = ’em

je les ai vues
(sounds like je lé zé vu)
I saw them

j’es ai vues
(sounds like jé zé vu)
I saw ’em

Contracting les to ‘es like this is an informal feature only, just like dropping the “th” in “them.” You don’t have to adopt this feature yourself when you speak, but you do need to recognise it.

What about tantôt?

This is a very useful word. It’s used to refer to a moment in the near past or in the near future.

Désolé pour tantôt.
Sorry about earlier on.
Sorry for what happened earlier on.

Merci pour tantôt.
Thanks for earlier on.
Thanks for what you did earlier on.

Tantôt tu disais que…
You were just saying how…
You just finished saying how…

À tantôt!
See you in a bit!

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