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Posts Tagged ‘viens-t’en’

On the radio, a woman who lives off the island of Montréal, in the suburbs, talked about how it takes her a really long time to get into the city on snowy mornings.

From the radio studio in Montréal, she said:

Ça me prend un temps fou pour m’en venir à Montréal.
It takes me forever to come to Montréal.

Un temps foua crazy time — is a really long time, forever.

S’en venir means to come. Maybe you’ve heard people use viens-t’en! before. It means come!, come here/along!

News:

A while back, I mentioned that I was working on a new guide about contractions heard in spoken language. I’m still working on it. But even before that one comes out, I’ll have a different guide ready for you. This one uses a question-and-answer format and overheard language to strengthen your knowledge of spoken French. It should be ready for you to buy in the OffQc store in the next few days. Stay tuned; details to come.

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1. A reader of OffQc tells me that he overheard someone say what sounded like jézaime. He was happy when he realised that he had understood what this meant: je les aime. It was pronounced informally as j’es aime (jé-zaime), where je les contracted to j’es.

2. I was reminded of the word cabaret the other day when the cashier at a restaurant counter asked if I wanted a tray for the food I had ordered. Voulez-vous un cabaret? Do you want a tray?

Nice tuque!

Nice tuque!

3. Learn these six words related to winter clothing: un gant (glove), une mitaine (mitten), un manteau (coat), une tuque (tuque, winter hat), un foulard (scarf), une botte (boot), and how to say below-zero temperatures: -26, il fait moins vingt-six.

4. A group of kids opened a box of Timbits. Before they started attacking the box, one of the kids exclaimed: un chaque! un chaque!, one each! one each!

5. A friend said y s’en vient, he’s coming, he’s on his way. Y is an informal pronunciation of il. The verb here is s’en venir. Similarly, je m’en viens, I’m coming, I’m on my way. Viens-t’en! Come!

6. A man wanted to get past me on the metro because he was getting off at the next station. He used the verb débarquer to describe the action of getting off the train. This verb can also be used to describe getting off a bus. Pie-IX is a metro station in Montréal. It’s pronounced pi-neuf. If you got off at Pie-IX, you could say j’ai débarqué à Pie-IX.

Image from Kena & Brutus

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1. de quoi tu parles?

Confused, a guy asked his friend de quoi tu parles?, or “what are you talking about?” Using the inversion here (de quoi parles-tu?) would sound much less conversational.

2. viens-t’en!

A mother told her child to come to her by saying viens-t’en, “come here.” The opposite (go away) is va-t’en. The infinitive forms are s’en venir (to come along) and s’en aller (to go away). Je m’en viens means “I’m coming.”

3. un esti de gros cave

A guy told his friend that the person they were talking about was un esti de gros cave, or “a big fucking idiot.” Esti is a swear word in Québec. Cave (idiot) isn’t a swear word, but it is an insult.

4. chu allé

During a conversation, my neighbour’s child pronounced je suis allé informally as chu allé. Another informal pronunciation you may hear is chui allé. My young neighbour also got into an argument with an another neighbour. He told her she was crazy: t’es folle!

5. y’a rien de bon icitte

An angry lady in a restaurant said y’a rien de bon icitte, “there’s nothin’ good here.” Some native speakers may find it odd to hear a learner of French say icitte instead of ici. Saying y’a rien de bon ici is perfectly conversational too.

Il y a is generally pronounced as y’a during conversations. In this example, y’a rien is an informal pronunciation of il n’y a rien.

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Just when it seemed like spring wasn’t too far off, winter has returned to Montréal. The city has turned white again and the snow is still falling.

On the radio, an announcer tried to reassure listeners that spring is indeed on its way, despite this latest snowfall. It’s supposed to warm up next week.

He told us that spring is coming by saying:

Le printemps s’en vient.

Perhaps you’re not familiar with how the verb s’en venir (to come) works. It’s used frequently in Québec, so it’s a good idea to learn it.

L’été s’en vient.
Le train s’en vient.
Les vacances s’en viennent.
Les examens s’en viennent.
Dis-lui que je m’en viens.
Viens-t’en, je t’invite*.

*je t’invite = my treat, it’s on me

Or from a song by Avec pas d’casque:

« La journée qui s’en vient est flambant neuve »

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