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Un sport vraiment trippant

I came across this poster in a Tim Hortons restaurant. Click on it to see a larger size.

On this poster, Tim Hortons is letting us know they support young people in soccer.

They describe the sport as trippant

Un sport vraiment trippant

If something’s trippant, it’s a lot of fun, exciting, amazing, awesome.

Sometimes you’ll see this adjective spelled as trippant, other times tripant.

ballon de soccer

un ballon de soccer

In Québec, association football (fútbol, futebol) is called le soccer.

jouer au soccer
to play soccer, football

Do you remember the verb triper (tripper) from previous entries?

Je tripe fort sur le soccer!
I totally love soccer!
I’m totally into soccer!

This sign (click to enlarge) from the Pages Jaunes lets us know that Montréal’s got everything we need to get ready for a zombie invasion:

À Montréal, il y a 193 gyms et 5 surplus de l’armée pour vous préparer à une invasion de zombies.

In Montréal, there are 193 gyms and 5 army surplus stores to prepare you for a zombie invasion.

Good to know, I guess!

Gym in French is pronounced like its English equivalent. In the plural, don’t pronounce the final s.

In Québec, le gym is a business where you go to work out, like lift weights or use the stationary bikes. Some gyms even have tanning beds in them.

aller au gym
to go to the gym

Je vais au gym deux fois par semaine.
I go to the gym twice a week.

Un surplus de l’armée is a store that sells army material no longer needed by the military, like clothing and tools.

Down at the bottom of the sign it says:

Téléchargez l’appli et allez-y!
Download the app and go!

une app
une appli
une application

télécharger une app
to download an app

Pronunciation tip: The sign uses the expression il y a. Don’t forget that il y a is almost systematically pronounced as ya during regular (informal) conversations in French.

Here’s an easy French expression that I think you’ll like to add to your vocab:

C’est fou comme c’est bon.
It’s amazing how good it is.

I saw this sentence on a sign in Montréal (at night). Click on the image to see it full size.

You can replace bon with other words.

C’est fou comme c’est beau!
C’est fou comme c’est cher!
C’est fou comme c’est compliqué!
C’est fou comme c’est petit!

Remember, after c’est you always use the masculine form even if it refers to something feminine.

Don’t say: c’est fou comme c’est belle une femme enceinte.

Say: c’est fou comme c’est beau une femme enceinte.

TELUS (a mobile phone company in Canada) tells guys to put their phones and penises away… all while demonstrating the expression se garder une petite gêne as used in the French of Québec.

Hey, what more could you ask for in a cellphone provider?

TELUS released an advertising campaign on Facebook this month. The ads promoted July as a cellphone manners month — basically, don’t take your phone out at inappropriate moments, like at the restaurant or cinema.

Many of the ads, like the ones that follow, included sexual innuendo capitalising on the whole pulling-your-phone-out / pulling-your-dick-out thing. (I think it’s a thing, isn’t it?)

Click on the images to see the enlarged version.

In the first example, the ad reads:

Avez-vous tendance à vouloir le sortir à table?
Do you have a tendency of wanting to take it out at the table?
Gardez-vous une #petitegêne

The question is literally asking if you have a tendency of wanting to whip out your phone while at the table.

Between the lines, however, is the question of whether or not you whip out what’s between your legs as well.

‘Cos, you know, it’s common knowledge that as soon as guys sit down at the table for supper, they have an uncontrollable desire to pull their penis out.

But the second part, gardez-vous une petite gêne, what does that mean?

We’re being told to not do socially unacceptable stuff and to restrain ourselves, like from wanting to use our phone at inappropriate moments or from wanting to take our penis out.

(Yes, really. This all gets even better below.)

Se garder une petite gêne (and I believe this expression is unused in European French) means to show restraint in public, to show modesty.

So, for example, if a pervert on the bus suddenly took his penis out, you could politely admonish him by saying: Monsieur, gardez-vous une p’tite gêne!

If we pick the expression apart, we get: “to keep a little embarrassment to oneself.” You know, like whipping your dinky out at the table — keep a little embarrassment to yourself and put that thing away.

The TELUS campaign continues with examples of different men who don’t keep a little embarrassment to themselves — they take not only their phone out at inappropriate moments, but their member as well.

In this second ad, we see that TELUS has taken a special moment between two young people in love and turned it into something filthy.

Dude has a tendency of taking his phone slash penis out on the first date:

Je le sors même de mes jeans au premier rendez-vous.
I even take it out of my jeans on the first date.
Gardez-vous une #petitegêne.

Or how about at the restaurant?

In this third ad, I don’t think our lady friend would like it if her date whips his phone slash penis out before the crème brûlée is served and things start getting really hot and sleazy down at the resto.

Espérons qu’il le garde sous la table jusqu’au dessert.
Let’s hope he keeps it under the table until dessert.
Gardez-vous une #petitegêne.

Has the expression gardez-vous une petite gêne been burnt into your memory yet? Good!

In this fourth ad, we’re reminded that juillet est le mois de la courtoisie au cellulaire (July is cellphone manners month), followed by this information about our last licentious slimeball (or is he the same slimeball from the last ad?):

Au cinéma, il ne reste jamais longtemps dans mon bermuda.
At the cinema, it never stays put in my shorts for very long.
Gardez-vous une #petitegêne.

OK, TELUS! I think we’ve understood loud and clear — July is the month for keeping our phones and penises where they belong at inappropriate moments.

Got it, guys? In July,
on se garde une p’tite gêne.

(July ends next week.)

I came across a little sign in a sports equipment store. It says:

Faites votre frais avec ce gilet.

There’s word play going on here… To understand it, you first need to know the expression faire son frais as used in Québec.

One of the advantages of this gilet is that it’s been designed to keep you cool, or frais, when you wear it.

That’s why the author of this sign chose the expression faire son frais to promote it — it allows for wordplay on frais, “cool.”

What does faire son frais mean?

Faire son frais means “to show off” in Québec.

There are two forms to this expression: a masculine form (faire son frais) and a feminine form (faire sa fraîche).

What this sign is telling us is that we can show off by wearing this gilet, with the added meaning conveyed by the word frais that it will keep you cool.

Faites votre frais avec ce gilet.
Show off with this shirt.
(and keep cool)

More examples of faire son frais…

As usual, I went digging around on the web looking for good examples of the expression faire son frais, faire sa fraîche. Here’s what I found. Remember, you can click on all the images to see a larger size.

A Facebook update reads:

Ce chien fait son frais dans une Porsche!

This dog is showing off in a Porsche!

In the image, we see a dog poking its body out the window, showing off as he rides in a Porsche.

On a site called Gros Blogue, I found an article about the best selfie of the year. They displayed images of different selfies taken by celebrities.

For one of the selfies in particular, the caption used the expression faire son frais:

Joseph Gordon-Levitt qui fait son frais dans sa limousine.

Joseph Gordon-Levitt who’s showing off in his limousine.

The smug look on his face says it all… faire son frais!

And the feminine form faire sa fraîche

But what about the feminine form faire sa fraîche? All the examples that follow refer to females (or feminine nouns).

A blog author expresses dislike for the show Tout le monde en parle and has this to say about it:

J’écoute que très rarement l’émission Tout le monde en parle, je suis vraiment pas capable de Guy A. Lepage, Dany Turcotte et de l’espèce de pétasse prétentieuse qui fait sa fraîche avec son vin.

I only watch the show Tout le monde en parle very rarely. I really can’t stand Guy A. Lepage, Dany Turcotte and the pretentious bitch who shows off with her wine.

Side note 1: Do you remember the informal expression pas capab’? If someone says chu pas capab’ de Guy A. Lepage, it means “I can’t stand Guy A. Lepage.” In entry #812, we saw examples of this expression, like: Moi là, l’hiver, pas capab’, which means that the person can’t stand winter.

Side note 2: The verb écouter is used very frequently in Québec to talk about watching a television show. Regarder is also used in Québec, but know that you’ll probably hear écouter used more often: écouter une émission, to watch a show.

In another example, a blog commenter writes a sentence that mentions a sister-in-law showing off with a new coat from France:

La belle-sœur faisait sa fraîche avec son manteau commandé en France (…).

The sister-in-law was showing off with her coat ordered from France.

And in this last example, the author of an article about cars comments on the lack of style of a particular model of Hyundai:

Donc, aussi digne de notre attention fût-elle, cette petite machine n’a jamais fait sa fraîche au chapitre du style.

So, as much as (this car) was worthy of our attention, it’s never stood out (lit., showed off) as far as style goes.

cochon d’Inde

And here you thought I totally forgot about part 2 of our mini-series about the Québécois French word bibitte

Actually, you’re right — I did forget. So let’s look at part 2 right now before I forget again!

In part 1, we saw that bibitte can be used to talk about bugs in Québecois French. If you haven’t read part 1, you can read it now and come back.

In part 1, we saw this example:

J’haïs ça les bibittes!
I hate bugs!

Now here’s part 2. Below are examples pulled from the wonderful world of the world-wide web. (I’ve made minor changes for simplicity.)

In a forum online where users discussed the animal they most feared, one commenter said:

Je truste pas les lapins. J’aime vraiment pas ça pantoute. Les cochons d’Inde pis toutes ces bibittes-là aussi.

I don’t trust rabbits. I really don’t like them one bit. Same goes for guinea pigs and all those kinds of critters.

Not only does the commenter dislike those bibittes, he doesn’t even trust them, il les « truste » pas (from the informal borrowed-from-English verb truster, which sounds like troster).

On a different site, a blog author had this to say about chickens:

Même si les poulets sont assez sédentaires, ça vole ces bibittes-là!

Even if chickens mostly just sit around all the time, those creatures can fly!

OK, so we’ve got one person who used bibitte to talk about rabbits and guinea pigs, and another who used it to talk about chickens. Let’s keep going.

This next blog author talks about the time she and her boyfriend made a discovery in the trunk of their old Buick 77 left parked in a barn:

Rendu chez ses parents à Thetford, il ouvre son coffre… ça couinait! Mon chum qui déteste ces bibittes-là, je prends des gants et commence la fouille […].

Once he got to his parents place in Thetford, he opened the trunk… something was squealing in it! My boyfriend hates those kinds of critters, so I grabbed some gloves and began searching (in the trunk).

The author goes on to explain that she found four squealing baby mice in the trunk of the car.

The author called the trunk le coffre. You’ll also hear francophones in Québec call the trunk of a car la valise.

There’s also a Wiktionnaire entry dedicated to bibitte. An example there reads:

– Viens-tu, on va aller voir les serpents!
– Ouh! Non, j’aime pas tellement ça, moi, ces bibittes-là.

– Come on, let’s go see the snakes!
— Ooh no, I don’t really like those things.

Rabbits, guinea pigs, chickens, mice, snakes… What does the Usito dictionary from Québec make of all this?

In entry number 2 under bibitte, it says:

BIBITE ou BIBITTE, n.f.
2. Petite bête, souvent sauvage.

“A small creature, often wild.”

So now you can add this second use to your knowledge of the word bibitte:

2. Critters (and other beasts), often wild, often small and furry… but not always!

1. Bugs!

Perhaps you’ve heard of Mai Duong in the news. She’s a 34-year-old Montréal woman suffering from leukemia who needs a bone marrow transplant to save her life.

She’s in desperate need of a compatible stem cell donor from her Vietnamese ethnic background.

Héma-Québec says they lack donations from all non-Caucasian ethnicities. Mai needs people of Vietnamese origin to get tested. At the end of this post is a description of how you can help. Let’s hope a match will be found.

An update from the Save Mai Duong Facebook page appeared in my feed today. In it, we learn that Mai’s situation was discussed on Salut, Bonjour! here.

According to Save Mai Duong, Salut, Bonjour! did a good job — even if they did get Mai’s name wrong.

À part scrapper le nom de Mai complètement, Salut Bonjour a fait une pas pire de belle job.

Other than totally messing up Mai’s name, Salut, Bonjour! did a pretty nice job.

Salut, Bonjour! did a pas pire de belle job, and so did the author of the Facebook update — we’ve got some pas pire de bons exemples of Québécois French.

scrapper quelque chose
to mess something up

scrapper le nom de Mai
to mess up Mai’s name

also:

scrapper son char
to total one’s car
(wreck in an accident)

une job
a job

pas pire
not bad

faire une pas pire de belle job
to do a pretty nice job

Here’s how you can help Mai Duong

This is taken from the Save Mai Duong Facebook page:

Mai has cancer. The dirty kind that comes back. She needs brand new Vietnamese stem cells to stay alive. We need ppl of Vietnamese origin to get swabbed!

Mai Duong is a 34-year-old from Montreal who’s battling acute leukemia. For the second time, because life’s a bitch. She desperately needs a Vietnamese stem cell donor in order to save her life.

If you’re in Quebec, you can sign up for a swabbing kit here:

English
http://www.hema-quebec.qc.ca/cellules-souches/donneur/index.en.html

French
http://www.hema-quebec.qc.ca/cellules-souches/donneur/index.fr.html

In the rest of Canada, you can sign up here: http://www.blood.ca/CentreApps/Internet/UW_V502_MainEngine.nsf/page/onematch?OpenDocument&CloseMenu

In the US, sign up here: http://bethematch.org/

En France, veuillez vous inscrire sur: http://www.dondemoelleosseuse.fr/devenir-donneur

In Germany: http://www.zkrd.de/

If you have questions, contact Save Mai Duong.